And my footy tipping went well…

Yes, only one wrong and I got the margin score correct! So well placed so far…

I also predicted the NSW Election correctly. I honestly don’t mind Gladys. Here in The Gong Labor won hands down: 70+% two-party preferred. And in first choices look who no-one supported!

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Tonight’s must-watch: Waleed Aly interviewing Jacinda Ardern on The Project, Channel 10/WIN.

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Waleed’s interview/confrontation with Scott Morrison was broadcast ad-free in prime time last Thursday night — most unusual.  And unusual it was! Scott Morrison scored some, but also, I think, showed his critical weaknesses. I propose to watch it all again and may then comment further, but meanwhile I commend young Michael Koziol’s analysis. (He is I gather a twenty-something.)

Sincerity can be a real struggle for Morrison, partly because of his marketing background, and partly because of his own choices as Prime Minister that have sacrificed substance for political expediency (moving the embassy to Jerusalem, anyone?). So if he faces a credibility gap on this issue, perhaps he only has himself – and his party – to blame….

Interesting by-election in Sydney

I predicted around four weeks ago on Facebook that Dr Kerryn Phelps would win the Wentworth by-election, and repeated that on the Friday before the vote. Well, despite some doubts arising on Sunday, it’s now looking most likely: “The independent has reached what looks to be an unassailable lead, sending the government into minority. ”

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The booth-by-booth result is interesting to me, having lived in or near the Wentworth electorate for quite a few years to 2010.

Looks to me that Scott Morrison running the Jerusalem embassy move up the flagpole on Tuesday 16 October had little effect one way or another on the electorate in Wentworth. There are indeed quite a few Jewish voters there, but the majority of really observant Jews among then would have pre-polled, as the vote fell on the Sabbath! So if the Liberals were angling for their votes, they wasted their time last Tuesday.

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A sane book on energy

Yes, I am reading heaps, library books and ebooks, moderns and classics —  but I am not bothering to document it all here. Some I will mention, including this latest: A History of the Energy We Have Consumed. In fact it is:

energy

It’s quite fascinating, and so refreshing in contrast to the partisan claptrap we have had from our PM du jour down through the buffoons who fester on the pages of the Murdoch tabloids or lurk at night on Sky. Shocked to discover Rhodes is 81 years old too! You’d never guess!

Lots of who’d-a-thought moments. Did you know there was a link between bird-shit on islands off Chile and the Irish potato famine of the 1840s? Did you know that burning coal “with its ubiquitous content of radium and thorium, releases more radioactivity into the environment… than any other fuel”?

Rhodes makes an intelligent case for properly managed nuclear power.  He cites the capacity factor (pp. 330-1) of various power sources in the USA, that is how much of the time they actually generate electricity. “Even plants powered with coal or natural gas generate electricity only about half the time.”

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Compare:

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Lately we have had the latest report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) , the response to which by Scott Morrison was south of pathetic. See also Coal is on the way out, the only question is how quickly.

A supplementary thought from my cousin Ray, from the Mining Museum at Lithgow NSW. “This happened at the Lithgow State Mine site. Lithgow has the credit of hosting Australia’s first privately owned wind farm, and the world’s first solar powered train. People should never question my coalmining town’s environmental credentials.” He is referring to Lithgow Railway Workshop gets national engineering nod for solar train.

Nineteen years of blogging!

Beginning offline, if that counts. See some of the earliest here.

These entries have been pasted from Angelfire. There may be some oddities in presentation here.

I first got a real (borrowed) computer in late 1999 and didn’t go on the Internet until a few months later. My first site on Talk City came about in around April 2000, and the first internet diary entries soon after. The earliest entries here were written in a Brother PowerNote (memory 32k!) which I still have and sometimes use.

Go to Found — a whole stack of my old entries! [January 14 2008] for an index to what is available still on the Wayback Machine.

And a sample, strangely relevant today:

Tuesday, January 20, 2004

Notorious hypocrite Howard rants about ‘values’.

I am so bloody angry that I have put this entry to record how personally insulted I feel, and disgusted on behalf of all my colleagues, by John Howard’s recent gratuitous attack on state schools in Australia. As far as NSW state schools are concerned, what the PM has said simply reveals that he has not done his homework:

NSW public schools teach essential values for life to children and young people.

Love of learning

NSW public schools aim to create young Australians who value learning and knowledge and who relish the effort and possess the confidence needed to resolve problems, or to master a skill, topic or subject; who can compose clear and precise prose and construct well-founded arguments; who have mastered the art of talking with others as a route to better understanding; who are deeply interested in finding common ground with other people, other ways of life and ways of thinking and believing; and who are interested in imaginative and new ideas, and in seeking out truth.

NSW public schools teach the value of:

  • scholarship, accurate and extensive knowledge, wide reading and understanding of traditional and new fields of study, including information technology
  • rational inquiry and logical, well-founded argument
  • clarity, confidence and coherence in thinking, writing and speaking
  • curiosity and imagination as the basis for pleasure in learning
  • communicating with others as a way of establishing agreement and arriving at truth.

Aiming for high standards

NSW public school students are encouraged to achieve their personal best and to aim for excellence in everything they do.

They are encouraged to participate in sport and creative performances and to learn ways of winning and losing graciously.

NSW public schools teach the value of:

  • aiming for the best in academic, creative and sporting achievement and in all public performances.

Care and respect for ourselves and others

In partnership with parents and carers, NSW public school students are taught how to respect and care for themselves and others, in order to achieve self-discipline and physical and mental well being. They learn respect and care for others through the codes and practice of good manners, the give and take of friendship, the routines of companionship and the management of friendly rivalry. They learn respect for expertise, legitimate authorities, and leadership through acceptance of responsibility. They are taught ways of recognising right from wrong.

NSW public schools teach the value of:

  • recognising right over wrong
  • honesty and courtesy
  • health, fitness and well being
  • discipline, punctuality, reliability
  • experience, expertise and authority
  • friendship, companionship and friendly rivalry
  • self-discipline, independence and responsibility

Care and respect for families and communities

NSW public school students are encouraged to feel and demonstrate empathy and respect for those who are vulnerable and dependent. They learn to demonstrate the values of generosity and compassion and the principles of fairness. In turn they earn the right to expect to be treated by others with respect and fairness. As members of families and communities they learn how to treat others with consideration.

NSW public schools teach the value of:

  • kindness and helpfulness towards those who are vulnerable, or who are less able than others
  • the rights of individuals and groups to a fair go
  • sharing and equity as principles of personal and social relationships
  • different histories, customs, cultures and outlooks within home and school communities and in the Australian community

Respect for work

NSW public school students learn the need to grasp opportunities, the rewards of effort, and the value of work. They learn to see how work is changing and how new forms of work encourage experiment and resilience. They learn with new and evolving technologies and are taught to welcome innovation. Public school students learn to work well together with different kinds of people.

NSW public schools teach the value of:

  • paid, unpaid and voluntary work
  • opportunity, aspiration and enterprise
  • creativity, experiment and resilience
  • working together and in competition
  • skilled workmanship
  • productive habits and methods.

Proud Australians and citizens of the world

As young Australians, NSW public school students learn to understand and appreciate the beauty and uniqueness of their land.

They learn about Australia’s creative arts, literature, and history, and the insights to be gained for the future good of Australia. They learn to appreciate the significance of Australia’s Indigenous people and of immigration to Australian identity.

NSW public school students are taught to respect the rule of law and Australia’s democratic institutions and procedures. They are taught their own rights and responsibilities, and those of groups and governments under the code of law and systems of justice.

NSW public schools teach the value of:

  • Australia’s democratic institutions and procedures
  • the rights and obligations of governments, individuals and groups under the rule of law
  • the contributions of Indigenous people to Australia, and their history and struggles as our country’s first custodians
  • the beauty and uniqueness of Australia’s landscapes and environments
  • the histories and cultures of all Australians
  • the role of migration in building Australia’s place in the world
  • the interdependence of human beings with each other and with the natural world

Values for Australia’s future

These values help each NSW public school student to take full advantage of new ideas and knowledge which characterise the social and economic environment emerging in Australia, and in the world community.

In conjunction with an excellent general and vocational education, this code of values enables young Australians educated in NSW public schools to freely choose and enjoy their paths through adult life, to master the complexity and variety of the contemporary world, and to contribute as citizens to making Australia a better, more prosperous and happier place.

Perhaps the PM regards some of these as “excessive political correctness”? There are probably some values there the PM would have a problem with — but that is his problem, and ours in having a neanderthal for a Prime Minister. I can understand someone who hasn’t had an original or really broad-minded thought in the past forty years thinking that way, just as I can find it quite remarkable that a man whose prime value is how to hang onto power, stifle debate, and lie to the Australian people whenever it seems necessary to achieve his goals is suddenly the mouthpiece for “Australian values.”

Am I being disrespectful?

Bloody oath I am.

I have no respect for John Winston Howard, none at all.

Meanwhile any bigots or loonies who wants to gather half-a-dozen kids together to start a “school” advocating, say, “flat-earthism” as a parental value, are sure to get their hands on government cash these days.

Roll on the election!

 

Shire: Jannali, Cronulla, family

Is it really a week since I posted this on Facebook’s Sutherland Shire Heritage page?

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That’s my sister-in-law Aileen and my niece Christine (Parkes) in front of The Cotton Shop, Box Road Jannali in 1959. My mother owned The Cotton Shop, a very successful dress shop — until she broke her spine falling over a vacuum cleaner in the shop. The business went on under a manager and in the early 1960s moved to Sutherland, but was never the same without my mother running things. In Jannali she had customers coming from all over Sydney, not just The Shire. On Facebook Mark Wright said: “Mum remembers it mate. She knew Mrs Whitfield.” That’s nice.

Couldn’t help reflecting that in 1959 I was in my final year as a student at Sydney Boys High, and that it was also the 8th term of Prime Minister Robert Menzies! He seemed to me then to have been PM forever, though I did dimly recall his predecessor. Menzies continued until 1966. They built them to last in those days!

1966 I began teaching at Cronulla High School, now in Scott Morrison’s electorate. My second HSC class there — and the second HSC ever! — have a reunion planned. I have been invited, but am not sure I can make it. Night-time events in Sydney are an issue for me these days, but I will surely be there in spirit.

Class of 1968 member Paul Weirick has also sent a list of those attending. Brought back lots of memories.  Fortunately, I had been able to attend a couple of events around the 50th anniversary of the school itself — so I haven’t totally missed out.

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