Recycled: pictures from four years ago

Selected from Monthly Archives: April 2013.

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Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Church, Wollongong

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Macedonian Orthodox Church Saint Dimitrija Solunski, Wollongong

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Thistle, West Wollongong

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Mount Kembla from West Wollongong

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Vanishing “birdcage”– Wollongong Mall

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West Wollongong house on the move

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At the Kiama Jazz and Blues Festival in March 2013

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My 1977: Alexandra Road, Glebe

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In 1977-1978 I was seconded to the Faculty of Education at the University of Sydney, along with an old friend Richard Stratford. We were immediately responsible to Ken Watson, a name still well-known in English teaching circles.

The Ken Watson Address

To honour a remarkable educator, the ETA has named the keynote address of the annual conference for Ken Watson who has supported and inspired more than a generation of English teachers. The address focuses on an area of particular significance for the time and this collection of keynotes will provide a record of key concerns for the English teaching profession.

A colleague was the wonderful Roslyn Arnold.

Roslyn was an academic in the Faculty of Education and Social Work from 1974 until 2004 and was the recipient of a University of Sydney Teaching Excellence Award. She was subsequently Dean of Education, Head of School at the University of Tasmania and Professor of Strategic Partnerships.

I had the temporary rank of “Lecturer” (with parking privileges) and an office in the basement of Fisher Library, under that big stack on the right:

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But it is where I lived that I wish to focus on now – Glebe Point, my first taste of inner city living. The house in Alexandra Road Glebe belonged to the sister of one of my Class of 1974 students at Illawarra Grammar, whose husband was captain of a patrol boat in the north. I was house-sitting, basically. But what a place!

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That’s the house in 2004, but little has changed. I was in the right-hand one next to the block of flats. Next door: Jorge Campano, a Spanish guitarist so good that when he practised I just turned off everything and listened. He is still at it. This is from 2012:

The family is in the business too these days.

‘What You’re Doing To Me’ is the new solo single from Cristian Campano, frontman of Sydney garage rock outfit Food Court.

With elements of emotive ’60s balladry, a soaring string arrangement and hypnotic Flamenco guitar, the track is a cathartic outpouring from the Sydney-based artist. After winning the Seed Fund songwriting competition ‘It’s All About The Song’, Cristian headed to Alberts Studios in Sydney where he teamed up with acclaimed producer Tony Buchen (The Preatures, Andy Bull, Montaigne, Bluejuice, The Church).

The song is a family affair, featuring Cristian’s Granada-born father Jorge Campano (an acclaimed Spanish classical/Flamenco guitarist) and his brother Adam Campano (Pretend Eye) on bass. Food Court’s Nic Puertolas played drums, while Buchen drafted in a local string quartet to bring his arrangements to life.

Over the road were a scientist, a doctor, and the man on the right in this cartoon:

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A 1932 cartoon depicting George Hele (left) and George Borwick, umpiring partners in the Bodyline series

This was in George Borwick’s house:

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That’s the ball with which Donald Bradman scored his 100th Test Match century, now in the Bradman Museum.

At the conclusion of the innings the ball was souvenired by match umpire George Borwick. Bradman and Borwick knew one another well with Borwick having regularly umpired First Class and Test matches in which he played from the early 1930’s, including the infamous Bodyline series. At the end of the match, Borwick sought to present Bradman with the ball, but he refused, signing the ball instead and insisting that Borwick keep it.

George Borwick later had the ball mounted on a silver plate and bakelite trophy with the utilitarian inscription “Pres.by / Don Bradman / to / Geo. Borwick / 100th 100 / 1947”

George Borwick proudly kept it on his mantle piece in his Glebe home for many years on display. Later it passed on to his son and then his grandson David who recently brought it to the museum.

In giving the ball, David explained that he was seeking the best home for his grandfather’s prized possession. He had met Don Bradman through his grandfather as a child and spoke of the respect the two men had for one another.

He recalled Bradman, Lindsay Hassett and Keith Miller returning to the family home with George Borwick after an early conclusion to a Sydney Test match in 1969. While waiting for his grandmother to cook a meal of rabbit with white sauce and carrots, the four, together with young David, headed into the back garden for a game of cricket which progressed smoothly until Keith Miller drove the ball into Mrs Borwick’s prized roses!

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So I lived opposite George Borwick, the cricket umpire in Sydney back in the 1930s and heard a lot about that from him, and about life in Glebe going back forty or fifty years.

Neighbours on my side of the road were John and Nan Waterford and their family. John Waterford was a former prisoner in Changi and on the Burma Railway, with no hatred for the Japanese. He and his family opened my eyes to politics. I met famous Labor politician Peter Baldwin through them later on. Glebe politics has always been colourful.

I told something of John’s story in 2007.

When I lived in Glebe in the late 1970s one of my neighbours, very hospitable folk whom I came to know well, was John Waterford, father of the Canberra journalist Jack Waterford. He was a survivor of the Burma Railway and wrote up his experiences. Not only did John tell me about all this but I have also read his memoir Footprints.

Footprints by Pte. John Waterford (2/18 Bn)

A story of the experiences and philosophy of a young country lad, as he was, when he enlisted, who was lucky not to be in the firing line on those occasions, when his Unit had its two most important encounters with the Nips, in the Nithsdale and adjacent Joo Lye Estates at Mersing and on Singapore Island. As a P.O.W. was sent to Blakang Mati, but had need of hospitalisation for appendix operation, which sent him back to Roberts Barracks and therefore made him available for selection for “H” Force, when it went up on the “Railway”. A tribute to Father Marsden and Major Fagan.

He has been unlucky to have been stricken with multiple sclerosis. He turned his hand to writing as a type of a therapy, because of his physical handicap. His first effort was devoted to the research and writing of his Family History.

He was encouraged then by his brothers and sisters to write this book, “Footprints”. It is only a 54 page paper-back and the cost of printing it was met by the family.

John is long gone, but what I recall most is how little he hated the Japanese. Indeed, when I knew him one of his major points was his belief in the need for good relations with Japan, and China. The last chapter of his book is about that. He and his family were originally from out Coonamble way; they were also early champions of Aboriginal land rights and reconciliation and great supporters of the work of Fred Hollows. (I do get peeved when the Right appropriate all this tradition, forgetting even such elementary facts as the actual politics of Simpson: the Man with the Donkey at Gallipolli.) I notice John’s story is retold in Legacies of Our Fathers: World War II Prisoners of the Japanese – their Sons and Daughters Tell their Stories ed. C. Newman (2005).

Related: My latest very odd article published.

To Chinatown and back

Great day yesterday, complicated only by Chris T just missing the 9.47 express to Sydney which departed with me aboard spot on 9.47. Chris T was in the lift descending to the platform at that moment, but he caught the next an hour  later and eventually found us in Zilver.

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Zilver was good, though a bit of a queue to get in for yum cha. Now despite the well-deserved accolades, Chris T and I find Wollongong’s Ziggy’s House of Nomms actually has better dumplings. There were some excellent dishes though.

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Dumplings from Ziggy’s House of Nomms

We presented M with a tube of white fur silver needle tea from Ziggy’s.

This rare tea was only given to royalty and was revered for its purity.  The popularity of this white tea reached its peak during the era of the Chinese Emperor Hui Tsung (1101-1125 A. D.).  Legend has it this Emperor loved this rare tea.  In the pursuit of searching for the perfect cup, the perfect brew, the obsessed Emperor lost his empire to the invading Mongols.

Imagine that, dear readers, losing your empire over a cup of good tea.  Though based on the aforementioned attempt of maintaining the purity of the leaf, it must be worth it.  What do you think?

After yum cha M proposed a walk to the Chinese Garden in Darling Harbour, but Max, Chris T and I opted out and went instead for a wine or Guinness to the Palace Hotel (1877) on the corner of Hay and George Streets. Delightful young Canadian barman. So much renovating and digging going on in this area at the moment.

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I found myself suffering tram nostalgia from the sound of the bells on passing trams. This first bit of Sydney’s resurrected light rail has been in operation since the late 1990s at least. The trams looked like this in 2008:

Light rail near Belmore Park, late afternoon

I of course was thinking of the ones I would often catch to Sydney High sixty years ago:

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The current trams look like this; Chris T and I caught one very crowded tram back to Central before (just) catching the 4.29 back to Wollongong:

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What I saw in December 2014

Photo recycle from Monthly Archives: December 2014.

Happy Christmas to all my readers

Posted on December 24, 2014 by Neil

Feel free to substitute a more relevant greeting if that is needed.

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That’s a view from my table at Diggers yesterday after lunch. Note the big x-ray envelope on the chair. As I said on Facebook: “Chest pain: not good at my age or any age. Went to doc. Probably muscular, but ECG not unambiguous. Need to recheck 27 December… If it gets worse, I call an ambulance and go to hospital. If not, better! Whatever, I still sing the praises of our health system — thanks Gough! No matter how it has altered, it is still far better than almost any country you can name. Protect it, people!”

OK so far.

Winding up the Redfern visit

Posted on December 13, 2014 by Neil

From Sunday 7 December.

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In Redfern Street

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These buildings have had a most interesting history over the past 40 years. Great and not so great, but rarely uncontroversial, things have happened here. See Church Mouse (A small voice from St Vincent’s Redfern), Redfern Jarjum College, and Jarjum College opens amid hopes and concerns.

REDFERN: Jarjum College, a new independent Catholic school for Indigenous children, was officially opened on April 12 [2013]  before a crowd of over 500 people. On the site of the former St Vincent’s Presbytery in Redfern Street an old building has been transformed into a small school with a current intake of 20 students…

…In officially opening the school Governor Bashir thanked the children and the work of Principal Beatrice Sheen as well as mentioning her own family connections to Redfern through her grandparents who lived in the area.

After working for a number of months at the new school, Lottie Ceissman is now one of its most vocal critics. She was recently dismissed from her role. As well as believing that she has been unfairly treated in her dismissal, she is also very critical of the direction that the school is taking and has raised strong concerns regarding the present quality of education at the school. “The Jesuits have come in with a ‘top-down’ attitude,” she said.

“They haven’t involved the local community. You cannot run a school like this. They are not learning reading, writing and arithmetic. They are learning how to do dot paintings. The principal is just trying to make it too ‘aboriginalised’. They don’t even have a proper play yard. I don’t want my job back. It’s an unsustainable place. They started 26 kids and now they are down to 20.”…

And then to Surry Hills

The Sydney visit ended with lunch with M at the Shakespeare Hotel in Devonshire Street — not as good as on earlier occasions as they mixed up our orders sending out very indifferent fish and chips instead of the much better grilled barramundi we were expecting.

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In the Shakespeare Hotel

M was a bit sore and sorry too as his bike had been hit by a taxi the previous Sunday. I guess all things considered he was lucky the injuries were not worse.

More from the Redfern visit

Posted on December 12, 2014 by Neil

From Sunday’s trip to Sydney.

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That’s the new building above Club Redfern

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And looking back from Regent Street/Redfern Street

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This street sculpture has caused some controversy. What do you think?

THE mother of deceased indigenous youth TJ Hickey is supporting a push to have the controversial Redfern Bower sculpture removed from the suburb.

The Bower was commissioned by the City of Sydney in 2008 as part of a $16 million upgrade to the Redfern St area…

Last Saturday: Wollongong Toy Run

Posted on December 10, 2014 by Neil

Back to The Gong for this entry. Last Saturday in Crown Street Mall I witnessed the 25th Wollongong Bikers’ Toy Run. This has become a Christmas fixture, not only here but elsewhere.

25th Annual Wollongong Toy Run (NSW); 6 December. Leaves 10.30 am sharp from cnr Shellharbour Road & Addison Street, Shellharbour; travelling to Wollongong Lower Mall (Crown Street). Please do not wrap toys/presents. Toys should be for ages 3—13 (ages 10—13 in most need).

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That’s the Lord Mayor, Gordon Bradbery, on stage, extreme left.

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Still in the present: Redfern revisited

Posted on December 8, 2014 by Neil

Sunday I took the 7.45am express to Sydney, getting off at Redfern.

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I hadn’t been to Redfern in quite a while. The immediate purpose of the trip was lunch with M at The Shakespeare Hotel in Surry Hills, but I decided, it being Sunday, to go early enough to attend South Sydney Uniting Church. I hadn’t been there for quite a while; I suspect this was the last time: South Sydney Uniting Church last Sunday. It proved a bit of a bonus because along with some old friends there were quite a few Indigenous Australian young people from Arnhem Land and Darwin down for some conference or other.

But on the way I paid another pilgrimage.

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Redfern Park

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Yes, home of The Bunnies!

Back in the present

Posted on December 6, 2014 by Neil

So humid, and so many storms lately! Here is the view from my window on 4 December:

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See Climate change: NSW to become hotter, more fire danger days and Sydney weather: The picture that captures story of city’s early-season tempests.

Yesterday morning in Crown Street Mall, Wollongong:

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Musicians from The Illawarra Grammar School

What I saw in December 2010

Photoblog recycle from Neil’s Wollongong & Sydney Monthly Archives and Neil’s Second Decade Monthly Archives.

November has gone and summer is supposedly here…

Posted on December 1, 2010 by Neil

Sirdan and I were lucky to have had a bit of a break when we went touring last Sunday; since then La Nina has been doing her stuff again. However, we almost saw the view from the top of Mount Keira.

Crown Street Surry Hills is still there…

Posted on December 6, 2010 by Neil

To South Sydney Uniting and the Sirdan’s at Rosebery for a Sunday lunch of duck and risotto. City Rail turned on an UNSCHEDULED ADDITIONAL EXPRESS TRAIN! The ride up was therefore quick and comfortable. The ride back at 4.30 was more cattle class – everyone in Wollongong seems to have gone to Sydney yesterday.

Returned books to Surry Hills Library, including David Hicks’s Guantanamo.

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Vietnam War Memorial, Wollongong Harbour

Posted on December 12, 2010 by Neil

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Pre-Christmas Random — 2

Posted on December 14, 2010 by Neil

Christmas lights, Mount Keira Road West Wollongong.

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Walk around West Wollongong –1

Posted on December 17, 2010 by Neil

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Christmas lights house in daylight

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Summer cicada

Now THIS is a hamburger!

Posted on December 24, 2010 by Neil

None of your Maccas nonsense at this North Wollongong Beach place.

And in Wollongong Crown Street Mall: