Some other July days in the past decade or so… A photo post

Looking through my archive for July 2016 I see retrospectives that are worth selecting from. So here are some, nothing too heavy.

Posted on July 13, 2009

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Passing parade — Elizabeth Street, Surry Hills

Posted on July 24, 2009

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Cornstalk Bookshop, Glebe — owner Paul Feain at the freebies table…

Posted on July 11, 2010

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Sunday lunch — Trinity Bar, Surry Hills

Posted on July 14, 2011

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On Wollongong City Beach looking towards Port Kembla.

Posted on July 19, 2011

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Lunch at The Diggers Club.

Posted on July 27, 2011

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Wollongong Harbour.

Posted on July 20, 2012

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Lunch at the Steelers Club — the club and the neighbourhood are totally changed since then!

Posted on July 13, 2013

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A rare sighting of Michael Xu in Wollongong, at the back entrance to Illawarra Grammar School in fact.

Posted on July 29, 2014 

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From my window, Mount Kembla on the left.

Posted on July 11, 2016

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Lunch with Chris T at Ziggy’s House of Nomms, which included two treats especially, the first being a sencha tea delicately scented with flowers. Lovely. The second we tried because we didn’t know what it might be, but it turns out to be a thing! Taiwan Taco Gua Bao.

Let’s talk about the weather…

Over in the USA, so US ABC News tells me, they have been baking east and west. Here Sydney had its coldest June day since the 1880s. (The Gong was a degree or two warmer — we got to 12C.) Oh, and in case anyone starts: I know the difference between weather and climate. Do you?

Cold June days are not entirely unprecedented of course, as I discovered back around 2000 when exploring my own family history.

The relation of Jacob Whitfield (convict arr. 1822 from Ireland) to William and Mary (such Protestant names!) now seems established: he was their father. Certainly he witnessed the wedding on 20 June 1836 at St Andrews Presbyterian Church of William Whitfield and Caroline Philadelphia West, along with the other witnesses Maria Burgess and William Burgess. On 18 September 1836 (yes, I can count!) the baptism is recorded at St James Church, King Street, of William Joseph John Whitfield, son of William and Philadelphia. William gave his profession as carpenter, and his address as Elizabeth Street. The child had been born on August 14. (By the way, it snowed in Sydney on June 28 1836.)

Some question that 28 June 1836 event as possibly just being sleet. However, it was clearly a cold week for William and his pregnant wife on their wedding day, it appears.

Victoria copped the wildest of our weather event, but the predictions of snow in the central ranges of NSW certainly came true. Mr Rabbit (once a regular on my blogs as far back as 2000) is now a teacher in the Blue Mountains; he tells me that his school closed at 10am yesterday. His school is not far from Medlow Bath railway station which looked like this:

That photo and the others here were posted yesterday on Facebook. FB friend and South Sydney Uniting Church member Julie McCrossin was staying in Blackheath:

This is an official shot warning of road conditions:

But the most brilliant photo I saw has to be this one from Mount Victoria by Gary P Hayes — and he says: “and no, not photoshopped for the trolls out there …”

Looking back ten years from the start of winter 2021 — 2

This is the second of two posts of selections from my June 2011 photo blog. This time I focus on Wollongong Harbour.

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Words have been unnecessary for these — but study this one and see the harmony we so often achieve in this wonderful (at its best) multicultural Wollongong — and Australia. A pox on all who would undermine this!