Blogging the 2010s — 102 — November 2010 — a

So back to the 2010s! I am skipping entries for October 2018 and 2019 in favour of a longer treatment of November 2010, as the “a” would suggest. There will be one more for that month, maybe two. You will see why when it happens. Today’s selection I hope you find pleasing.

Illawarra Flame

The iconic indigenous plant of Wollongong.

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Yesterday’s storms went either side of us

Though they looked threatening…

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Yesterday’s Sunday lunch

Left a hot Wollongong Station heading for Surry Hills:

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Objective: to meet Sirdan at the newly reopened Strawberry Hills Hotel:

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Verdict: great reno job. Restaurant? Green weeds drowned rather than drizzled in olive oil. Pork chop: OK but very fatty. Mash and baby carrot (one) – so so. Outcome: cleansing for the bowels, or was that a coincidence?  The Trinity Bar need not at this stage fear the competition.

Blogging the 2010s — 99 — October 2015

Spring morning: koels

This morning the Eastern or Common Koels were particularly vocal – like this.

Most often I hear rather than see them, but this morning they settled briefly in the tree just outside my window.

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This post – thanks to Dion’s bus service!

Dion’s Bus Service is a living legend in the Illawarra.

Dion’s Bus Service was founded in 1923 when Thomas Dion commenced operating a service from Wollongong to Balgownie followed by a service to Bellambi. It is currently the oldest operating bus operator in the Illawarra.

From December 1927 until 1931 a coach service was operated to Sydney. In January 1928 it commenced operating route 1 services from Wollongong to Austinmer, along with five other operators. In August 1929, Barney Dion commenced operating a service from Wollongong to Kiama…

That Kiama run has long ceased, but there is a story about it my father told me. It is recounted here.

And that’s not all!

The Headless Ghost of Dunmore House is reasonably well-known in Kiama. The Chair of the Illawarra Business Chamber, Les Dion, of Dion Buses, sent a copy of the Dion family history to the Pilot’s Cottage, in which it is recorded one of his uncles witnessed the Headless Ghost while working as a bus driver on the last Kiama run of the night in the 1950s. According to this account he chased the Ghost with his bus, until it threw a rope up into the trees and disappeared. Other ghost stories mentioned in the dusty old files include the Swamp Bull of Terragong Swamp, near the Honey farm at Kiama Downs. It is recorded in the Honey family history that they went down to a hole in the swamp where they thought the swamp bull lived and blew it up with explosives. Another ghost story mentioned is the sight of the boat coming down Minnamurra river in the early morning mist on Boxing Day, the same time every year as a famous tragedy on the river.

See this 2013 story:

It’s not often you bump into a local legend on a bus – or driving one, for that matter.

Aged 93, Les Dion snr took a lap around Wollongong on one of his family’s iconic buses yesterday to celebrate 90 years of Dion’s Bus Service.

From humble beginnings with a single Model T bus with wooden seats and canvas sides in 1923, Dion’s grew into an Illawarra institution as it ferried thousands of locals  to work, school and beyond.

‘‘I’m proud as punch for what the family did,’’ said Les Dion jnr, now manager of Dion’s after taking over from his father.

‘‘They went through some tough times, the Depression and the world wars, so it’s some pretty big boots to fill.’’

To celebrate nine decades in the Illawarra, Dion’s yesterday offered free bus rides to its customers.

Jacob Robinson, of Fairy Meadow, was one of those who instantly recognised Mr Dion snr when he got on the bus.

‘‘I remember Les when he used to drive my bus to school,’’ Mr Robinson said; Mr Dion snr only retired from driving buses at age 85.

‘‘Dion’s is one of the most recognised names in the Illawarra. It’s massive for any company to reach 90 years in business.’’

As a comparison, Dion’s has lived through 23 Australian prime ministers; is six times older than the WIN Entertainment Centre;  and had been in operation for almost 20 years by the time Wollongong was officially named a city in 1942.

The company also started at a time when Chinese immigrants were a marginalised section of Australia, making its success all the more remarkable due to tense race relations at its inception.

‘‘The Chinese heritage, that was a challenge as well, but when you look at this community, everyone is so respectful of them,’’ Mr Dion jnr said.

‘‘That’s what makes the job hard, living up to the standards set.’’

And as for the future?

‘‘I don’t know about another 90 years, but we’ll be around as long as we can,’’ he laughed.

 

Let me tell you about yesterday and the Austinmer bus – possibly this one:

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I had spent some time with friends at Steelers but rather than lunching there I went over to The Brewery. After an excellent lunch I wandered out to the old Catholic cemetery to pay my respects to the memorial of William Smith, who arrived in 1822 on the “Isabella 1” with my convict ancestor Jacob. See Tangible link to the convict ship “Isabella” and the immigrant ship “Thames”.

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I then wandered over to City Beach:

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Returning to the bus stop nearest The Brewery I saw that the 2.30 Dion’s Austinmer bus was about to go. I decided to catch it back as far as City Diggers, where I alighted.

No sooner was I off the bus than I realised my mobile phone and my camera were no longer in my pocket. Tragedy! I contemplated what to do over a glass of red at Diggers, then went down to the bus stop near the Greater Union cinema and waited for Dion’s buses returning to Wollongong. The driver of the one I stopped rang the depot and reported my loss. About ten minutes later as that same driver was outward bound up Burelli Street he called to me out the driver’s window: “They’ve been found!” and told me to go to the Depot in Fairy Meadow.

I did so – by Dion’s bus of course. No phone or camera handed in yet though. The woman at the desk contacted the driver of the bus I had been on originally, which happened to be returning to Wollongong at that precise moment – and yes, he had my things. As soon as I reached the stop near the Depot he arrived, gave me back my belongings, and a free ride back to Wollongong. So around two hours after my loss all was restored!

So you see, if it wasn’t for the lovely people at Dion’s those photos above (and a few more) would have gone forever! But Dion’s have a reputation for kindness. The story goes that during the Depression they often gave battlers free rides.

Blogging the 2010s — 96 — October 2012

I was so productive this month it has been hard to choose just two!  Note on the second one:  my friend Philip has since moved to another part of New York City.

My Asian Century

In 1962 I looked at a map and made a choice. The lesson of the map was bleeding obvious even then.

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In its own way World War II, during which I was born, spoke the same message: YOU ARE HERE! Get used to it!

So I chose to study Asian History at Sydney University in 1962 with two quite brilliant lecturers, Dr Ian Nish and Marjorie Jacobs. We galloped through China and Japan in two terms (Dr Nish) and India in one (Marjorie Jacobs) and never quite got to South East Asia though I had bought the textbook – D G E Hall in those days. I read it anyway. I wrote essays on Ram Mohun Roy and on the Sian Incident 西安事变. Turned out to be the one and only time I topped a subject at Sydney U!

Then at Cronulla High teaching History, among other things, from 1965 (student teacher) through 1966 to 1969, I always Asianised the curriculum – that is I took time out to make time lines showing, or devote a lesson to, what was happening in India, China, Japan, S-E Asia at the same time as, say, Elizabeth I. Indeed my first history job in 1965 was teaching Indonesian history to a Year 10 class – or 4th Year as we called it then.  And of course in the 1960s Cronulla High was a pioneer Indonesian teaching school – the place where I first heard an anklung orchestra – the school had one – or tasted nasi goreng.

Yes, the 1960s, folks.

And then at TIGS from 1971 to 1974 I taught mainly English, but also for a while I was History coordinator and in addition (under the Social Sciences Department) taught Asian Studies. Yes, Asian Studies, and there were even actual published text books and a syllabus and everything. Even before Gough Whitlam, if only just! in 1970 there was even a NSW  HSC subject called Asian Social Studies with 919 candidates. I remember having my class cooking (allegedly) Japanese food from recipes in an Asian Studies text book. We ate it and also fed it to the staff. First time I had ever used soy sauce or cooked bamboo shoots.

Wollongong High had a thriving Indonesian language group in the 1970s.

And so it goes.

Then of course we had the Keating era where the “Asian century” idea was first floated, though I am not sure the expression was used. We were reminded that we are part of Asia, and the map makes that quite incontrovertible, I would think. We sure as hell are not part of Europe. On the other hand, culturally and institutionally we draw on Britain plus, which also distinguishes us and is in my view something extraordinarily valuable we have to offer the region and something also to be cherished as part of what Australian has come to be. This has never struck me as a terribly difficult balancing act, though we did sadly get plunged into Pauline Hanson going totally batshit about being “swamped by Asians” for a while there and John Howard made sometimes worrying gestures in that direction, knowing where his votes were coming from but also by nature uncomfortable with the Keating era vision and with anything that happened before 1959. On the other hand in the Howard era we (and he) were busily engaged with Asian countries just as much as ever, simply because that is where we are and what is bound to happen. And of course we intervened in East Timor, something I for one supported.

And Sydney High, where I worked most of the time from 1985 to 2005, offered Mandarin as well as Ancient Greek. I even wrote a cross-cultural text, based on some class work at SBHS, called From Yellow Earth to Eucalypt (Longman 1995).

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Now here we are again. I haven’t read the White Paper yet, just skimmed. It is fascinating. It is also, as I said yesterday, pretty much what anyone leading Australia now would envisage, but as others have pointed out it is also less substantial than it could be. I guess it gives a bit of a vision which may even lead to outcomes.  I wouldn’t hold my breath about some of it though.

See also Ben Eltham, No Cash For The Asian Century, Richard Tsukamasa Green, Asian languages are essential because they are essential, Bill Mitchell, The Asian Century White Paper – spin over substance. Now that is a pretty diverse bunch with rather similar messages.

And there is the sad story of the decline of past promise, when it comes to Asian languages. I don’t think either Cronulla High or Wollongong High has Indonesian any more, and that is typical. See a report last year in the Herald.

Just 9 per cent of 72,391 [NSW] HSC students studied a language this year. Of the 34 offered, French was the most popular with 1471, followed by Japanese with 1376.

For all the rhetoric on the need to move closer to Asia, Indonesian was studied by only 232, Chinese by 1091 and Hindi, the language of a future powerhouse, by just 42…

Just checked: Cronulla High offers Japanese in the HSC; Wollongong High School of the Performing Arts (as it now is)  offers introductory Korean in Years 7 and 8; Heathcote High in The Shire (where my grandnephews and grandniece went in recent years) has Indonesian in Years 7 and 8 and a 15 year long linkage to schools in the Hitachi-Omiya district in Japan.

How different will things be in ten years time? Honestly, I wouldn’t hold my breath. See also Tim Lindsay Australia’s Asia literacy wipe-out.

Do also visit Dennis Wright and Maximos Russell Darnley – both extraordinary people who know much more than I do.

Meantime, enjoy the sight of an Illawarra Flame Tree in Figtree, just south of West Wollongong. They were taken yesterday.

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New York, New York

Coincidentally I have been reading about the seamier side of New York City just lately: Alphaville.

The cocky and often triumphant confrontations with bad guys make “Alphaville” a strangely entertaining read. But the book is also a reminder of how far into danger and degradation New York fell in the late 20th century. Today New York is the safest major city in America. Yet the homicide rate so far this year is 15% higher than last, and the numbers for rape and robbery are rising, too. The watchword for urban safety, as for so much else, is eternal vigilance. We never want to return to the bad old days—which aren’t all that old.

That at least has made me more aware of the geography of the city, so recent reports have thus meant more to me.  I have never been there. I do know a few people who are there now. Here are two.

  • Philip Costello, a friend, and flatmate a couple of times in the 80s and 90s. “To all those who may be concerned. No damage, leaks or flooding at my home, but am affected by the big power outage that is affecting a large part of Manhattan. Have fled to the Upper West side to a friends apartment till power is restored.”
  • Jeremy Heimans – former SBHS student and all-round amazing internet person – #11 of the Top 100 Creative people in Business 2012, I see. “Sadly, #sandy is just the new normal. We’re going to face this more often & with growing severity for the rest of our lives. #climatechange” – Jeremy on Twitter four hours ago.

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Not a million miles from where Philip normally lives these days:

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There could of course for some be a “better” explanation. Jeremy tweeted on 27 October: “At a gay wedding in Garrison, NY and guess what has just appeared in the sky? A rainbow.” See? Winking smile

But seriously… There actually is a tinfoil hatted preacher saying just that! When will they ever learn? No sane person will believe him, of course.

“God is systematically destroying America,” McTernan writes. “Just look at what has happened this year.”

Calling Sandy “the most powerful hurricane on record” that “could do catastrophic damage to the entire Northeast,” McTernan adds, “Obama is 100 percent behind the Muslim Brotherhood which has vowed to destroy Israel and take Jerusalem. Both candidates are pro-homosexual and are behind the homosexual agenda. America is under political judgment and the church does not know it!”

Is it bad taste to mention that climate change may have played a clear part in the recent events? Normally I am very wary of linking specific events to climate change – the danger of that should be obvious. However, in this case I would ask you to consider:

1. The New Yorker 29 October 2012.

As with any particular “weather-related loss event,” it’s impossible to attribute Sandy to climate change. However, it is possible to say that the storm fits the general pattern in North America, and indeed around the world, toward more extreme weather, a pattern that, increasingly, can be attributed to climate change. Just a few weeks before the Munich Re report appeared, scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, in New York, published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on the apparent increase in extreme heat waves. Extreme summertime heat, which just a few decades ago affected much less than one per cent of the earth’s surface, “now typically covers about 10% of the land area,” the paper observed. “It follows that we can state, with a high degree of confidence, that extreme anomalies”—i.e., heat waves—“such as those in Texas and Oklahoma in 2011 and Moscow in 2010 were a consequence of global warming because their likelihood in the absence of global warming was exceedingly small.” It is worth noting that one of several forces fuelling Sandy is much-higher-than-average sea-surface temperatures along the East Coast.

2. The Munich Re report of 17 October 2012

Nowhere in the world is the rising number of natural catastrophes more evident than in North America. The study shows a nearly quintupled number of weather-related loss events in North America for the past three decades, compared with an increase factor of 4 in Asia, 2.5 in Africa, 2 in Europe and 1.5 in South America. Anthropogenic climate change is believed to contribute to this trend, though it influences various perils in different ways. Climate change particularly affects formation of heat-waves, droughts, intense precipitation events, and in the long run most probably also tropical cyclone intensity. The view that weather extremes are becoming more frequent and intense in various regions due to global warming is in keeping with current scientific findings, as set out in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as well as in the special report on weather extremes and disasters (SREX). Up to now, however, the increasing losses caused by weather related natural catastrophes have been primarily driven by socio-economic factors, such as population growth, urban sprawl and increasing wealth.

Among many other risk insights the study now provides new evidence for the emerging impact of climate change. For thunderstorm-related losses the analysis reveals increasing volatility and a significant long-term upward trend in the normalized figures over the last 40 years. These figures have been adjusted to account for factors such as increasing values, population growth and inflation. A detailed analysis of the time series indicates that the observed changes closely match the pattern of change in meteorological conditions necessary for the formation of large thunderstorm cells. Thus it is quite probable that changing climate conditions are the drivers. The climatic changes detected are in line with the modelled changes due to human-made climate change.

The Head of Munich Re’s Geo Risks Research unit, Prof. Peter Höppe, commented: “In all likelihood, we have to regard this finding as an initial climate-change footprint in our US loss data from the last four decades. Previously, there had not been such a strong chain of evidence. If the first effects of climate change are already perceptible, all alerts and measures against it have become even more pressing.” Höppe continued that even without changing hazard conditions, increases in population, built-up areas and increasing values, particularly in hazard-prone regions, need to be on Munich Re’s risk radar. All stakeholders should collaborate and close ranks to support improved adaptation. In addition, climate change mitigation measures should be supported to limit global warming in the long term to a still manageable level. “As North America is particularly exposed to all kinds of weather risks, it especially would benefit from this”, added Höppe…

3. Paul McGeogh, Leviathan: how Sandy links to a warming planet.

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4. The Midweek Wonk: What We Know About Sandy and Climate.

October 29 lecture by GeoScientist Christian Shorey at the Colorado School of Mines, describing the most current knowns and unknowns about Sandy in the context of climate change. 15 minutes long, good summary for anyone that needs an instant cliffnotes primer.

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5. And for sheer lunacy: “An endlessly rich source of denialist paranoia and craziness, Infowars, now suggest that President Obama is using secret technology to direct Hurricane Sandy up the East Coast…”

6. NY Governor  Cuomo and Mayor Bloomberg.

NEW YORK — A day after New York City experienced its worst storm surges in recorded history, Governor Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the city may need to respond to climate change with steps like storm barriers. Such protections would be extremely costly, but climate change experts said Hurricane Sandy provided a first glimpse of the challenges all coastal areas will face as sea levels rise and extreme weather events become more frequent.

Cuomo said on Tuesday that he told President Barack Obama it seemed like “we have a 100-year flood every two years now.”

“These are extreme weather patterns. The frequency has been increasing,” he said.

Of protections like levees in Lower Manhattan, Cuomo said, “It is something we’re going to have to start thinking about … The construction of this city did not anticipate these kinds of situations. We are only a few feet above sea level.”

“I don’t know how practical it is to put gates on PATH tubes and subway tunnels,” Bloomberg said in a separate press conference. “What is clear is that the storms we’ve experienced in the last year or so around this country and around the world are much more severe than before. Whether that’s global warming or what, I don’t know, but we’ll have to address those issues.”

Although levees or other storm surge barriers might sound like fantasy to some, there are proposals on the table for introducing barriers across New York’s harbor or in the East River. Implementing them would cost at least billions of dollars — but infrastructure experts said the time to prepare for climate change is now, not after disasters.

Klaus Jacob, a climate expert at Columbia University, warned months ago that a major flood could result in $58 billion in economic damages from a large storm surge. An event on something like that scale appears to have come to pass….

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7.  Stephan Lewandowsky, Superstorm Sandy and the climate debate surge.

Please consider.

Our thoughts are with all in that vast area of the US North-East.

Later

Now we are seeing the extent of the damage: so terrible. Here are some posts I have encountered after writing this morning.

eureka8. 2012 SkS News Bulletin #1: Hurricane Sandy & Climate Change: “This is a round-up of selected news articles and blog posts about Hurricane Sandy, its impacts on North America, and its relationship to climate change. This bulletin supplements the regular SkS weekly News Round-Up which is posted on Saturday of each week.”

9. Peter Sinclair, The World’s Biggest Metaphor just Came Ashore.

10. Christopher Mims, How global warming helped transform Sandy from a hurricane into a Frankenstorm. Mims “is a former editor at Seed, Scientific American, Technology Review, Grist and Smithsonian, and in those roles launched blogs, redesigns, video series and other half-forgotten but otherwise influential experiments in new media. As a freelancer with the news metabolism of a hummingbird, he spent a decade writing news and analysis for the aforementioned, as well as BBC, WiredNature and the like.”

And an amusing post on Facebook from Philip Costello:

It’s the middle of a hurricane and when I look out the window, what do I see? A man jogging up the middle of 7th avenue wearing only his shoes and underwear!

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11. Kevin Trenberth, Opinion: Super Storm SandyThe Scientist.

…In many ways, Sandy resulted from the chance alignment of several factors associated with the weather. A human influence was also present, however.  Storms typically reach out and grab available moisture from a region 3 to 5 times the rainfall radius of the storm itself, allowing it to make such prodigious amounts of rain. The sea surface temperatures just before the storm were some 5°F above the 30-year average, or “normal,” for this time of year over a 500 mile swath off the coastline from the Carolinas to Canada, and 1°F of this is very likely a direct result of global warming.  With every degree F rise in temperatures, the atmosphere can hold 4 percent more moisture. Thus, Sandy was able to pull in more moisture, fueling a stronger storm and magnifying the amount of rainfall by as much as 5 to 10 percent compared with conditions more than 40 years ago.  Heavy rainfall and widespread flooding are a consequence.  Climate change has also led to the continual rise in sea levels—currently at a rate of just over a foot per century—as a result of melting land ice (especially glaciers and Greenland) and the expanding warming ocean, providing a higher base level from which the storm surge operates.

These physical factors associated with human influences on climate likely contribute to more intense and possibly slightly bigger storms with heavier rainfalls.  But this is very hard to prove because of the naturally large variability among storms.  This variability also makes it impossible to prove there is no human influence.  Instead, it is important to recognize that we have a “new normal,” whereby the environment in which all storms form is simply different than it was just a few decades ago.  Global climate change has contributed to the higher sea surface and sub-surface ocean temperatures, a warmer and moister atmosphere above the ocean, higher water levels around the globe, and perhaps more precipitation in storms…

…As human-induced effects through increases in heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere continue, still warmer oceans and higher sea levels are guaranteed. As Mark Twain said in the late 19th century, “Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it.” Now humans are changing the weather, and nobody does anything about it! As we have seen this year, whether from drought, heat waves and wild fires, or super storms, there is a cost to not taking action to slow climate change, and we are experiencing this now.

12. Foreign Policy, Joshua Keating, Don’t forget the storm’s other victims.

eureka13. Skeptical Science, Hurricane Sandy and the Climate Connection.

Extreme Weather on Steroids

The bottom line is that while global warming did not cause Hurricane Sandy, it did contribute to the “Frankenstorm” at least by causing higher sea levels (and thus bigger storm surges and flooding) and warmer sea surface temperatures (and thus probably a stronger hurricane), and there are a few other human influences on the climate which may also have contributed to the damage caused by the storm.

14. Skeptical Science: debunking “Hurricane Sandy had nothing to do with global warming”.

Blogging the 2010s — 87 — September 2013

My 14th September as a blogger, and my third in Wollongong!

West Wollongong–the birds again

It continues rather damp. See Flooding closes roads at Gerringong, Albion Park Rail. Here in West Wollongong the coral tree is obviously at its tastiest, as this morning’s view from my window shows.P9170198

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Cockatoo and rainbow lorikeets.

Amazing engineering feats, China, M, and West Wollongong parakeets

Last week I mentioned M being in Shanghai and the first episode of the BBC 3-parter Supersized Earth. That eating out in Shanghai these days may not involve chop sticks may be seen in this photo that just arrived by email:梅青

Last night’s Supersized Earth (Part 2) again was a forcible reminder of how different things are in the second decade of the 21st century, a fact not many of us of a certain age have really caught up with, I suspect. Among the many items shown was the amazing expansion of infrastructure in China in the years since M (pictured above in Shanghai last week) left in late 1989. We hear these things but they don’t entirely register, do they? Take bridges.

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I did note why China features so much though: Supersized Earth is a BBC/CCTV9 coproduction.

And I promised parakeets – well rainbow lorikeets in fact, here in West Wollongong yesterday. These are into the late afternoon sun, so not easy photographically, through my window and a fly screen.

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Australia burning: 1300 homes gone in NSW alone

Here in West Wollongong, intersection of the Princes Highway and Mount Keira Road, at 1.30 pm New Year’s Eve the digital thermometer outside St Therese’s Church stood at 41C. Looking from my window I could not see the escarpment for smoke haze. But that was nothing compared to what was happening 70 kilometres south and onwards hundreds of kilometres down through eastern Victoria. As stated by the NSW Rural Fire Services Commissioner, and others, there has never been in the recorded history of Australia such a fire season, never! And it is far from over.

The fires led the BBC News from London on New Years Day.

As I write this it is a moderate 20C. But the heat returns in two days time… I can’t see Mount Keira from my window. Smoke.

Wollongong has so far escaped serious fire. There is no reason to suppose this will continue. Nervous? Wouldn’t you be? Thick bush is within fairly easy walking distance of where I am sitting.

That New Years Day front page says it all — and I am sure you can explore the many videos and images out there.

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Inside that paper one story particularly attracted my attention: “Experts warn extreme weather risk growing”, which includes this reminder: “In 2009, a joint CSIRO and Bushfire CRC study, Assessing the Impact of Climate Change on Extreme Fire Weather Events over South-Eastern Australia (PDF), warned these weather events were increasing in frequency and could occur up to four times more often by 2100 if carbon emissions and climate change were unchecked.” And here we are! So that prompts me to bitter laughter at the shallow optimism displayed by Scott Morrison who presides over a government that has been more spin that action when it comes to climate change. Let’s abandon the terms “climate skeptic” and “climate change skeptic” — skepticism is after all not a bad thing. So rather than the flattery those terms involve, as if the holders of such views might have a reasonable case, call them out as “climate change recalcitrants” or “climate change troglodytes”. Because that is what they are.

At the same time I don’t propose to go in for psychodrama, dressing up in strange clothes or glueing myself to roadways. I suspect that such drama too often includes other agendas, not that I am saying that all those taking that path have such agendas. To each his/her own, I guess.

What I will do is use any opportunity that presents itself to present the case for totally taking seriously the need to understand what is happening, to consider all possible options to ameliorate or mitigate the situation, including considering nuclear energy, and to explore all reasonable and doable ideas for adaptation — because change is happening now and the accumulated lack of action in the past renders reversal of climate change unlikely. I am also open to impurity. If I want steel, for example, I probably have to want coke as well, and as you know that comes from coal mines. I continue to eat meat. I have hardly ever flown anywhere in my life, but would not want to make everyone do a Greta and find a high-tech sailing boat to take me to America — if I had to go there.

Mind you, given that country is led by the Arch-Recalcitrant, I do wonder why I would want to…

Meanwhile one cannot but be moved by the many stories that are coming out day after day, minute after minute.

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The main street of Cobargo, NSW, before and after bushfires destroyed a number of businesses on Tuesday. At least two people died in the town.

The media coverage has generally been excellent, particularly the ABC. News 24 has been wonderful, and even more so ABC Radio operating as an emergency broadcaster — on the bad days I have had it on most of the day. Looks like next Saturday will again be such a day.

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Victoria: A Mallacoota mother, whose photo of her 11-year-old son fleeing bushfires has been splashed across news websites and front pages, says she had no idea how much impact it would have when she took the photo.