Hope

I wanted a positive image to share with you on this day when we are just hearing of the violent fanatic attack in Paris. And here are two. They don’t answer everything, but do say a lot. They remind us that beauty and decency and  mere humanity just may be universal values.

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ameen-miqdad-a-violinist-from-mosul-who-lived-under-isis-s-rule

The story, if you missed it, is here, here and here.

MOSUL, Iraq: Amid the bombed-out ruins of an ancient site revered by both Muslims and Christians in Mosul, Iraqi violinist Ameen Mukdad on Wednesday held a small concert in the city he was forced to flee by Islamic State militants.

As Mukdad played scores he had composed in secret while living under the militants’ austere rule, explosions and gunfire could be heard from Mosul’s western districts where U.S.-backed forces are still battling Islamic State for control…

Wednesday’s hour-long concert marked his first return to the city that was overrun by Islamic State in 2014.

Mukdad said he chose the Tomb of Jonas, or Mosque of the Prophet Younis, as the site is known by Muslims, to symbolise unity.

“I want to take the opportunity to send a message to the world and send a strike against terrorism and all ideologies which restrict freedom that music is a beautiful thing,” he said.

“Everyone who opposes music is ugly.”…

I weep like a child for the past…

This is the final post in the poetry and music series memorialising my brother’s death.

D H Lawrence 1885-1930

Piano

Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me;
Taking me back down the vista of years, till I see
A child sitting under the piano, in the boom of the tingling strings
And pressing the small, poised feet of a mother who smiles as she sings.

In spite of myself, the insidious mastery of song
Betrays me back, till the heart of me weeps to belong
To the old Sunday evenings at home, with winter outside
And hymns in the cosy parlour, the tinkling piano our guide.

So now it is vain for the singer to burst into clamour
With the great black piano appassionato. The glamour
Of childish days is upon me, my manhood is cast
Down in the flood of remembrance, I weep like a child for the past.

1918

With Anzac Day coming up I add this song. The lady herself appears near the end She turned 100 recently! A couple of years back I sent a copy to my brother, whose childhood was dominated by World War 2. Also unlike me his earliest memories were of Shellharbour and Wollongong. 

Revisited Keating

The musical, that is. I saw it at the Belvoir in 2007: My 2007: retired and blogging.

This afternoon is when Lord Malcolm, Sirdan and I are booked to see Keating the Musical at the Belvoir. It seemed unlikely not long ago, as you may have read. It is still not a total cakewalk. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Sad news

Lord Malcolm is not well enough to go.

Later

Those tickets were booked back in November, in hope, but Lord Malcolm can’t actually walk at the moment. Sirdan and I went though, and I have to say it was great. The reviewers gave Keating 10/10 and it really deserves it. Afterwards we went to one of Surry Hills’s more delightful multicultural features: Erciyes Turkish Restaurant. Sirdan had never eaten Turkish before, and so liked it we have vowed we will do it again.

And would you believe it — Delenio and maybe The Rabbit may be interested — who should be in the restaurant but Oscar and his parents, whom I haven’t seen since many a Mine debate many a year ago? In fact, if you want to feel old, well if I want to feel old, just reflect on the facts. 1) Oscar turns 25 this year. 2) All the events portrayed in Keating happened since the time I met M! In the toilets at the Belvoir I said to another geriatric at interval: “Isn’t it terrible? It just seems like yesterday!” He replied, “Yes indeed. Sometimes the past is all you have left to live for!” I knew exactly what he meant.

Keating is sold out to the end of January. A new season is happening in March. If you are in Sydney, don’t miss it.

Extraordinary kindness…

10 JAN 2007

I just received an email from the writer/star of Keating!

Hi!

I’m sorry to hear that Lord Malcolm couldn’t make it to the show last Sunday. Please let me know if his condition improves enough that he might be interested in going (and that it wouldn’t be too exhausting, volume and commotion etc.) and I’ll scrounge around for tickets – there are generally a couple of house seats each show set aside for emergencies.

Thanks for your words on the show; glad you enjoyed it!

Cheers,
Casey B
Keating!

If ever I doubt this blogging thing is worthwhile, I’ll just reread this entry. 🙂

So having saved a copy some years ago to an external hard drive I was able to play it back yesterday on Junior HP. Wonderful.