And as April ends some final stats and farewell

This blog: 67,459 views.

Top Posts here for all days ending 2017-04-30

Home page / Archives 37,532 views
Anzac Girls last night on ABC 927
Outnumbered, Merlin, and other recently seen TV  715
Tom Thumb Lagoon 535
Restoration Australia: Keera Vale 351
Ziggy’s House of Nomms 337
Family history–some news on the Whitfield front 336
Lost Wollongong 335
What a treasury of family history! 293
My former workplace in the news today 292
Tangible link to the convict ship “Isabella” and the immigrant ship “Thames” 257
Random Friday memory: 1 – John Mystery, my brother, Illawong 243
The swimmer 242
The silence of the trams 220

Floating Life 4/06 ~ 11/07

Top Posts for all days ending 2017-04-30

Home page / Archives 67,043 views
Friday Australian poem #17: Bruce Dawe, “Homecoming” 23,422
Two Australian poems of World War II  18,355
Assimilation, Integration, Multiculturalism: policy and practice in Australia since 1966 1  15,965
Teacher Pride Rules!  13,301
John Howard: bullying expert extraordinaire…  7,981
Friday Australian poem #3: A D Hope, “The Death of a Bird”  7,580
Friday Australian poem #12: David Campbell “Men in Green” 7,362
Friday Australian poem # 6: Mary Gilmore, “Nationality” and “Old Botany Bay” 7,018
Friday Australian poem #4: Judith Wright 5,070
Ian McKellen and Judi Dench in Macbeth and segue into Mardi Gras  4,983
Friday Australian poem #16: Banjo Paterson “Fur and Feathers”  4,941

Floating Life

Top Posts for all days ending 2017-04-30

Home page / Archives 65,597 views
How good is your English? Test and Answers  15,813
Australian poem: 2008 series #9 — A B Paterson “The Angel’s Kiss”  11,639
Australian poem 2008 series #17: “Australia” — A D Hope 7,932
Australian poem: 2008 series #8 — Indigenous poetry 6,685
The Great Surry Hills Book Clearance of 2005 5,643
Australian poem 2008 series #10: Peter Skrzynecki “Summer in the Country” (2005)  4,893
Conflicting perspectives  4,241
Dispatches from another America  4,188
Sarah Palin — Blogs, Pictures, and more on WordPress  3,609
Delia Malchert – Migraine Aura – Scintillating Scotoma 3,241
The Real Da Vinci Code – Leonardo da Vinci 3,068
Cronulla 05  2,993

Neil’s final/second decade

Top Posts for all days ending 2017-04-30

Home page / Archives 61,494 views
A very personal Australia Day 26 January – my family  3,833
Being Australian 16: inclusive multiculturalism Aussie style 9 – my tribes 3,610
This may well be the best Australian history book I have EVER read! 3,304
Nostalgia and the globalising world — from Thomas Hardy to 2010 3,298
The Rainbow Warrior 2,598
Oldest house in Wollongong?  2,597
Wollongong local history 2,325
Jack Vidgen–Australia’s Got Talent last night  2,287
Sniffing out the swamp then looking up…. 1,969
Thanks, Tilly and Kate!  1,927
Australia’s Got Talent 2011 Grand Final  1,797

English, ESL — and more!

Top Posts for all days ending 2017-04-30: a rather amazing record!

How should I write up a Science experiment?  193,755 views
Home page / Archives  112,651
Essay writing: Module C “Conflicting Perspectives” – the introduction  56,345
A student’s “Belonging Essay” workshopped  49,805
What tense should I use when I write about literature?  40,885
Physical journeys and Peter Skrzynecki’s poems  38,601
Mary Shelley, “Frankenstein” — and “Blade Runner” 25,283
Studying the Gothic, or Emily Bronte?  24,107
The “Belonging” Essay 23,877
Is “majority” singular or plural?  19,275
Workshop 02 — NSW HSC: Area Study: Imaginative Journeys  18,529
Belonging pages: HSC 2009-2012 18,172
Scaffolding  15,160
Workshop 03 — Creative Writing (Year 12)  14,139

Neil’s Wollongong & Sydney

Top Posts for all days ending 2017-04-30

Home page / Archives 29,514 views
Small Buddhist temple 757
Volcanic eruption in Australia ‘3000 years overdue’! 488
Old haunt derelict now  481
Shellharbour 2 – Beverley Whitfield Pool Shellharbour 2 – Beverley Whitfield Pool 455
Surry Hills: new community centre and library nearing completion  431
2009 Mardi Gras Fair Day 4 – Mad Hatter’s Tea Party  404
Autumn sun Haymarket  372
Lunch at The Hellenic Club, Figtree 356
The amazing Surry Hills Library 1 346
Wollongong Mall 345
Paddy’s Market to Ultimo 2 – the markets 326
Corner of Goulburn and George Streets, Sydney 298
Loving Surry Hills 24: mosque 285
Aunty Beryl and the Yaama Dhiyaan Hospitality Training College Darlington 284

Ninglun’s Specials and Memory Hole

Top Posts for all days ending 2017-04-30

Home page / Archives More stats 25,044 views
Family stories 3 — About the Whitfields: from convict days 8,965
10. But is it art? Responses to the Bill Henson controversy of 2008 7,717
Sequel: Art Monthly Australia July 2008  4,814
Top poems 2: John Donne (1572-1631): Satire III — “Of Religion”  4,015
Family stories 4 — A Guringai Family Story — Warren Whitfield  3,891
05 — Old Blog Entries: 99-04  3,636 Look here for my earliest posts
Family stories 1 — mother  3,422
Surry Hills 3,108
Gustave Dore’s “Ancient Mariner” illustrations  1,979
Chinatown 13: Chinese Gardens Darling Harbour 8  1,823
Family stories 2 — About the Christisons 1,484
More tales from my mother 4 — Dunolly NSW — and conclusions  1,472
07 — a controversy — For the record: the great SBHS race debate of 2002  1,468

OK! Do explore those.

Does this mean this blog is coming to an end? Yes, after 17 years it does. There may be an occasional entry and I will continue to monitor comments. Meanwhile, see me on Facebook.

May 1:

I am considering bringing together in a more ordered way my various and scattered family history and memory posts, either here or on a fresh purpose-built blog.

And here is the solution:

Watch this space!

Cascading memories

Here is a series from my archives: Reflections, mostly about a chequered teaching career: Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four, Part Five, and add mais où sont les neiges d’antan? and Life’s embarrassing moments. From the last one:

Probably my most embarrassing moment was at Dapto High when I was the age Mr R is now. I had proudly been appointed teacher-in-charge of Year 8, and hence had to sit on stage in Year 8 assemblies. Dapto had 1,400 students then, so a Year 8 assembly was quite big. It was also the way the school fulfilled its scripture quota for the week, a local clergyman saying a few words at the assembly. I somehow managed to walk up to the microphone, spotlighted, only to be greeted by considerable laughter. In best teacher mode I glared and asked what was so funny…

“Your fly’s undone, sir…”

Oh dear!

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I was wearing undies.

All this from two images that came my way via Facebook. The first I found on Dapto History in Pictures. It shows the English staff at Dapto in 1969, the year before I arrived.

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Jim Gordon was Head Teacher from 1970, Tom Dobinson having gone on to become an Inspector. He inspected me at Wollongong High in 1976. Some more memories of Dapto in 1970:

The elopement

One day a member of the English staff disappeared. This was just one of several bizarre events that year, which led to questions in parliament.

We later heard she had eloped with a reporter from the local newspaper.

Skinny dipping

One staff member was around 22 and rode a World War II Harley Davidson, dressing to match. Otherwise he taught English and History. He was on good terms with “Animal” and other noted members of the Kings Cross biker scene. He had a wonderful place on the river at Minnamurra, a short swim (almost a walk at low tide) to the sandspit and beach. Many a good staff party happened there, and one warm night swimming was definitely the go. It wasn’t low tide, though, so he rowed across with his assortment of English teachers. I recall one Brian being counselled about guarding his Catholic manhood as in the then state of undress he stumbled getting into the boat almost bringing the gunwale into firm collision with his private parts.

Fortunately no-one drowned.

It’s not a good idea, kiddies, to go surfing in the dark, especially when intoxicated and there are sharks about.

The teacher who threw things out of windows

He was in fact rather popular, but when a child especially annoyed him he would, after several warnings, grab everything off the child’s desk and throw said belongings (but not the child) out the second floor window. He would then send the child to collect them. I got quite a shock when I first witnessed this.

I am sure conservatives would see this as evidence that schools today have declined in comparison with 30-40 years ago.

Breaking records

A large batch of 78rpm records destined for the school fete was stored in the staff room. One day our biker friend crept up behind someone and smashed a record over his or her head. We discovered this was painless but dramatically noisy and left very satisfying shards of black shellac everywhere. So we spent the lunch hour working through the records, not excluding any students who were foolish enough to knock on the door.

The cleaner complained.

The suit of armour

I was given the task of taking a suit of armour, a prop for the school play, to the school hall. I decided the best way was to wear it. This did get talked about for a while…

The head

I was so naive, really.

I had a class of Year 9s who were variously, well, retarded, or should I say differently abled. One of them had also been dealt a bad hand when it came to personal appearance, but was actually rather nice though occasionally given to rages. On graduation he found a job in a sheltered workshop.

The door of their classroom had a small window to enable passers-by to check on the inmates, but the glass had long gone. My young friend used to stick his head through this window and smile in a rather alarming way at people in the corridor. One day going past I asked him to pull his head in. I went further than that. Seeing he reminded me of nothing more than a moose head mounted on a wall I said, “Peter, pull your head in or I’ll mount you on the wall.”

Pleased with my wit, I recounted the story to my colleagues. “You’re so athletic, Neil,” a female teacher who later went on to considerable fame remarked.

My embarrassed blush lit the room beautifully. Honestly, governor, I meant no double-entendre!

The second picture appeared on an Illawarra Grammar ex-student’s Facebook page. Thanks, Ralph! It shows me being  “kidnapped”. As Ralph notes, “A long, long time ago …..”

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What was I up to in March 2002/2007

These retro posts are meant to be at five year intervals, but alas because of the sad fate of Diary-X most of 2002 is missing. I have however found one entry on the Internet Archive which at least shows what is missing.

Ninglun’s Books and Ideas: new series

31 Mar 2002 – Not unexpected.
29 Mar 2002 – Minds to treasure, and other matters.
28 Mar 2002 – Dramatic story, predictable response
27 Mar 2002 – Am I a puritan?
25 Mar 2002 – On keeping an online diary
24 Mar 2002 – What a wonderful day!
23 Mar 2002 – It’s a funny world, isn’t it?
21 Mar 2002 – Not when I was at University
20 Mar 2002 – Finis: Justice Kirby story
20 Mar 2002 – Minefields: many will disagree.
19 Mar 2002 – Feedback
18 Mar 2002 – Hefferlump self-destructs!!!
18 Mar 2002 – Trying to keep your head when all about you are losing theirs, etc.
17 Mar 2002 – Patrick Cook does it better…
16 Mar 2002 – More on the Kirby story
15 Mar 2002 – Here we go again
14 Mar 2002 – News causes diary to reopen
12 Mar 2002 – WATCH THIS SPACE
11 Mar 2002 – This diary is closed–for the time being at least…
11 Mar 2002 – Strive for balance in your life
10 Mar 2002 – We were not amused: Matthew Shepard did NOT deserve it.
09 Mar 2002 – Am I a turnip?
08 Mar 2002 – Dilemmas and hopes
06 Mar 2002 – Two cases of debunking…
05 Mar 2002 – On suffering at university?
04 Mar 2002 – Some nice bits of dissent…
03 Mar 2002 – Mardi Gras, morality and the open society–oh, and James Joyce. Later thoughts prompted by P Akerman.
02 Mar 2002 – Mainly on S I Hayakawa
01 Mar 2002 – Great movie, good company, challenging thoughts.

Those are dead links.

Now to March 2007.

Great pic from The Poet in Victoria

30 MAR 2007

triathletes come ashore

On a more personal note

30 MAR

Yesterday morning I spent time with Lord Malcolm, going with him to physiotherapy at the hospice and witnessing how he has virtually no muscles on his legs, and seeing both the determination and the pain as he did some gentle exercises. We then had coffee in the hospice coffee shop, wheeled out to look at Green Park for a while, and then back so he could be sent for another x-ray — some problem with the feeding tube.

Before tuition in Chinatown I had a call from ex-student Ross (class of 1976). We met and had a really good if shortish chat. Here is what one of Ross’s classmates has been up to, having diverged somewhat from Law.

Post against stereotypes…

26 MAR

I am at the moment wading through the white-hot prose of Londonistan. It was good then to drop in on Madhab al-Irfy, Irfan Yusuf’s more Islamic blog: Prayers for Allison Sudrajat (14 March 2007). Allison was the AusAid worker killed in the recent plane crash in Indonesia.

Tomorrow at 1:30pm, after dhuhr prayer, Canberra’s small Muslim community will join friends and family of Allison Sudrajat for a traditional Muslim janaza (funeral) prayer service followed by burial…

Read the post and think “Muslim humanitarian” for a change…

Lord Malcolm’s trip to Victoria

25 MAR

I expect to hear from Sirdan later this morning how this quite amazing trip worked out yesterday. Sirdan was accompanying him. When I visited Lord Malcolm on Friday he was psyched up for it, albeit still in the Hospice and with a feeding tube down his nose…

Later

Just got that call. They made it and it went well except Lord M ran out of steam about 1 pm and needed medical help, which was on site at the Air Show. They got back to Sydney safely. I am having lunch with Sirdan later today. No doubt I will hear more then. Lord Malcolm himself (by phone) says he had a fantastic day. 🙂

And later

After lunch at the Porter House Irish pub Sirdan and I visited Lord M, but he was too exhausted. Happy though. He really was given royal treatment at the Air Show yesterday. Sirdan’s part in that venture can’t be praised too much. He and Lord M did something almost everyone thought was impossible.

Voted, melted, and saw wildlife in Surry Hills

24 MAR

So here I am back from tutoring in Chinatown and voting in Riley Street. And is it ever hot! Daylight saving ends tonight, yet at 2pm it was near enough to 35C here in Surry Hills. (That’s 90+ for those who use F still.) On the way to tutoring I saw the biggest flock of cockatoos — right near Central Station — that I can ever recall seeing in Sydney. There must have been a hundred of them. They seemed to fill the space between Central and the buildings on the corner of Elizabeth and Foveaux. Strayed in from points west because of drought?

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I took that from Charlie Moores’ Bird Blog, on a page well worth looking at showing Sydney’s Botanical Gardens.

That was quite an Aboriginal moment too, as somewhere in Central someone was playing the didgeridoo giving the whole scene a rather magic quality — well giving that to me at least.

And then I voted. Yes, not Labor. Yes, not Liberal…. In neither House.

Another voice against torture

16 MAR

(a) We renounce the use of torture and cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment by any branch of our government (or any other government)—even in the current circumstance of a war between the United States and various radical terrorist groups.

(b) We call for the extension of basic human rights and procedural protections to all persons held in United States custody now or in the future, wherever and by whomever they are held.

(c) We call for every agency of the United States government to join with the United States military and to state publicly its commitment to the terms of the Geneva Conventions related to the treatment of prisoners, especially Common Article 3.

(d) We call for the legislative or judicial reversal of those executive and legislative provisions that violate the moral and legal standards articulated in this declaration.

Now who do you think that was? Amnesty? Human Rights Watch? The ACLU?

No: think Evangelicals for Human Rights. See Jim Wallis Thursday, March 15, 2007.

When I was a twenty-something conservative in transition…

11 MAR

… at Dapto High School south of Wollongong, a colleague in the English Department was Dale Spender, who once told me that if I didn’t have shit for brains I might know what she was talking about. Trouble is, she was probably right at the time. Dale went on to a career much more spectacular than mine. To give Dale her due, she knew far more back then than most of us did about how to deal effectively with some of the less able (as in “IQ too low to assess”) and more disadvantaged students we had, and I did learn much from her.

I see she has entered the current silly education debate: Now the class scapegoat is the teacher.

No one has a good word to say about teachers. Not so long ago they were well-informed and well-respected members of the community whose advice was sought after and highly valued.

Today, if you are to believe the Government’s condemnations and the media coverage, teachers have had a spectacular fall from grace.

Press stories over the past decade accuse teachers of everything from illiteracy and incompetence to outright ill will. A few regular media commentators charge classroom teachers with left-wing tendencies, lowering standards, and with throwing out the worthwhile curriculum in favour of “dumbing down”.

Yet no hard evidence of the harmful behaviour of teachers is provided. Rather teachers are being made the scapegoats for the disruptive changes that are under way in society – and in education. For education consultants [it] is so much easier to blame the teachers than it is to look more intelligently and constructively at the problems and pressures of the 21st-century classroom; and at the failure of the nation to properly fund the information-education revolution.

Teachers have been caught up in the turmoil of educational change, but they have not been supported with the resources to make the massive leap from traditional education to computer-based classrooms.

Teachers can teach only what they are taught. Now that they have to learn the art of teaching with the new technologies, they need information, facilities, and a great deal of encouragement. Without such support, it is the teachers who have the genuine grievances: they could put at the top of their list the counterproductive smear tactics used against them by Commonwealth educational advisers and ministers…

Each year teachers are asked to do more: more national testing, more meaningful reporting on students, more social welfare tasks and more new technology courses. And each year teachers are blamed for more school failures, more lapses of discipline, and more of society’s ills. Teaching is the most demanding job ever devised yet the teachers’ side of the story is rarely heard; they can’t “tell someone who cares”. The profession is so badgered and abused, the wonder of it is that there are not more of its members walking out the door.

The bad press that teachers get is not the only source of low morale. Teachers know that there can be no art of teaching with technology when the technology does not work. Spare a thought for the masses of overworked, dedicated teachers who stretch themselves to prepare exciting internet-based lessons only to enter the class of 30 eager, energised students, and find that the computers have crashed, and the network is down. Such disasters can be an everyday occurrence. And although this is definitely not the teachers’ fault, they who must deal with the dire consequences when their anticipated mind-expanding learning experience turns into a nightmare.

One might well ask how teachers’ critics and Co would stare down such high-maintenance students: it would take more than a pile of platitudes and a dose of Shakespeare…

Well, as for technology… I’m here, aren’t I? I suspect that Dale overstates her case a little in that article. It would have been more true ten years ago. It certainly was true of me ten years ago. Nonetheless, she has a better understanding of what is happening out there in the schools than many of her opposing commentators.

In her column today Miranda Devine praises the recently established Redfern Exodus centre which aims to provide intensive remedial reading to children in Years 3 to 6 who have fallen behind. It is a good project, housed at the moment by my very own church, South Sydney Uniting Church, but run by the Exodus Foundation of Ashfield Uniting Church. The methodology employed derives from the Macquarie University’s phonics-centred approach, and that is Miranda’s angle: the success of the MULTILIT programs underscores the tragedy of so many other young lives wasted – countless smart children who believe they are stupid because they haven’t been taught to read. I do not knock what is happening in Redfern, but do suggest Miranda (all praise to her though for supporting the venture) is unfair in her ideological stance. More “countless” than the numbers of students benefitting from this intervention are the numbers of students who do not need it because they have in fact been taught to read. No single factor explains the issues that led the minority being helped in this and similar programs to their present plight, though more adequate staffing and funding of remediation programs in schools both public and private would no doubt have helped. There are, even so, “countless” students who are assisted within the system and who therefore never need a Redfern program. For very many students the NSW government’s Reading Recovery program has been especially effective. I have seen it done, and spent a year some time back in a research project tracking its effects in a number of schools in a more disadvantaged part of the south-eastern suburbs. (See also Research in Reading Recovery.)

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Reading Recovery session at Brookvale Public School Sydney.

One key to both the Redfern program and the Reading Recovery program is individualised intensive tuition. It is a fact too that provision for such individual help after Year 2 in the system is inadequately funded.

All ideology aside, I wish all such programs success.

Forgotten and surprising facts on 21st century religion

02 MAR

That same issue of Atlantic Monthly from which I drew the previous entry also took me to The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. There is a fascinating survey there called Spirit and Power: a 10 country survey of Pentecostals. Some definition: “By all accounts, pentecostalism and related charismatic movements represent one of the fastest-growing segments of global Christianity. According to the World Christian Database, at least a quarter of the world’s 2 billion Christians are thought to be members of these lively, highly personal faiths, which emphasize such spiritually renewing “gifts of the Holy Spirit” as speaking in tongues, divine healing and prophesying. Even more than other Christians, pentecostals and other renewalists believe that God, acting through the Holy Spirit, continues to play a direct, active role in everyday life.”

Go to the survey report for yourself, but I place below two of several interesting fact boxes.

numbers.gif scripture.gif

A nice dilemma here in the political correctness and cultural relativity department: how to assert principles of universal human rights without cultural imperialism or belittling the right to difference in other cultures and consequently being ignored. Take Nigeria for example:

A proposed Nigerian law banning same-sex marriages is a threat to democracy, says Human Rights Watch. Writing to the Nigerian Senate, they said the legislation, “contravenes the basic rights to freedom of expression, conscience, association, and assembly”. The rights group urges the Nigerian National Assembly to reject the bill.

If the proposed law is approved, anyone who speaks out or forms a group supporting gay and lesbian rights could be imprisoned.

The bill has divided both chambers of the Nigerian parliament as some MPs see legislation as a move to save Nigerian morals and cultural values. Others legislators who reject it say it say it is anti-freedom and portrays Nigeria’s democracy in bad light…

Naturally I side with Human Rights Watch on this one. You can see the problem though, can’t you? In our focus on the USA and Australia we often forget the rest of humanity, and we forget that Christian fundamentalism is even more alive and well in developing countries than it is in the USA or Australia. We also forget that there is a positive side to this in terms of lives turned around, services delivered, and self-esteem restored; we need to set that against the dark side, the questions of gay rights, AIDS prevention and so on. I see a dilemma. Do you?

What was I up to one year ago?

At my age you have to check! Here are some highlights from February 2016. Feel free to explore that month’s posts. There were some good ones!

Ian Thorpe, Gayby Baby, and today in my life

Surprising big splash in today’s Sunday Telegraph, summarised here on Yahoo.

Australia’s most decorated Olympian, Ian Thorpe, has revealed he feels he was forced out of the closet in his teens, at a time where he was still grappling with his sexual identity…

For the 78ers

Who are the 78ers?

See The 78’ers:

“You could hear them in Darlinghurst police station being beaten up and crying out from pain. The night had gone from nerve-wracking to exhilarating to traumatic all in the space of a few hours. The police attack made us more determined to run Mardi Gras the next year.”
KEN DAVIS

See also SBS.

What has just happened?

1. The Sydney Morning Herald apologises to Mardi Gras founders the 78ers

On June 24, 1978, more than 500 activists took to Taylor Square in Darlinghurst in support and celebration of New York’s Stonewall movement and to call for an end to criminalisation of homosexual acts and discrimination against homosexuals. The peaceful movement ended in violence, mass arrests and public shaming at the hands of the police, government and media…

2. NSW Parliament apologises to the 78ers who began the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras

A brightly sequinned hat, tie-dye t-shirts and rainbow flags in the packed viewing gallery did nothing to distract from the gravity of the historical moment in NSW Parliament on Thursday morning when, after nearly 38 years, the 78ers received a formal apology from the state over the discrimination they suffered at Sydney’s first Mardi Gras in 1978.

“For the mistreatment you suffered that evening, I apologise and I say sorry,” said Bruce Notley Smith, the member for Coogee, as he moved the motion of apology in the NSW Legislative Assembly…

I was working at Sydney University in 1978 and for part of that year living in Glebe Point. Perhaps around mid-year, when that first Mardi Gras occurred, I had moved back to reside in North Wollongong, commuting to Sydney. I honestly don’t recall reading the infamous SMH stories. I was not at that time involved in the gay community.

Now posts of my own.

Back in the day… Oxford Street memories

Posted on March 9, 2014 by Neil  — A rather amazing picture appeared recently on Lost Gay Sydney, a Facebook group.

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That is Martin Place June 24 , 1978, according to the original post on Facebook, and there in the centre carrying a triangle flag is Ian Smith.

Requiem for a Dowager Empress

Posted on December 27, 2010 by Neil

The shocking news I alluded to earlier is that Ian Smith, aka The Dowager Empress of Hong Kong, died about a week ago.

He was a 78-er, that is a participant in the first Sydney Mardi Gras…

More “Neil’s Decades” –8: 1956 — 1

Back in 2007 I blogged:

Yes, fifty-three years ago next February this little boy from Sutherland started at age 11 to go to Sydney Boys High travelling through a Surry Hills Ruth Park would have recognised. The god-like Fifth Form students — High School only went to Year 11 then — included quite a few who became, well, god-like figures.

Did you know that the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade can trace its origins to the Department of External Affairs that was first established in 1901? Since that date, five old boys of Sydney High have headed the Department with responsibility for foreign or external affairs: Sir John McLaren (1887), 1929-1933 (as Secretary of the Prime Minister’s Department); Sir Alan Watt (1918), 1950-1954; Sir James Plimsoll (1933), 1965-1970; Sir Alan Renouf (1936), 1974-1977; and Dr Peter Wilenski (1955), 1992-1993. James Plimsoll and Peter Wilenski have also acted as Australia’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations in 1959-1963 and 1989-1991 respectively…

In fact quite a crop have been through the old SBHS, as you can see. I belong to the much greater ranks of Undistinguished Old Boys…

One of THE most god-like to us in 1955 was Marcus Einfeld, son of Jewish Labor Party politician Sydney (Syd) Einfeld and his wife Billie. He did indeed go on to a distinguished career, and it is sad to read what is befalling him at this time. Just what he did remains to be tested, but if proven it really would make you wonder why on earth he did it, as Legal Eagle does in How the mighty may fall

And now here I am in Wollongong and it is sixty-one years since 1955! So in 1956 I was in Second Year, or as we now would say, Year 8. Today I offer some evocative pictures. The first two you have seen before.

Memorabilia 16 – 50 years on

Posted on April 7, 2009 by Neil

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Me, 1955

See also Memorabilia 15: 1959 — or thereabouts, Fifty years on – guess what, nothing is for ever!, Now, what did I learn half a century ago?, Sydney Boys High School 1955, I wasn’t a prefect…, Time and friendships 2 — the class of ‘59, This may well be me….

Lost Wollongong again

I discovered the Lost Wollongong Tumblr towards the end of January and thought I would check if there were some new items. There are. Here are three that appeal to me.

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Stuart Park and Fairy Meadow Beach from Smiths Hill in the early 1900’s (Wollongong City Library)

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Crown Street looking east across Church Street in the early 1960’s.

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Crown Street looking east from Keira Street in the 1950’s. Lowes is still in the same place (Wollongong City Library)

See the Lost Wollongong main site.

Lost Wollongong members have contributed over 15,000 photos from their personal collections and open sources for preservation and everyone to enjoy…

You can also add your own photos of Wollongong, old and new, to our community heritage forum. Simply go the ‘Photos’ tab at the top of the page, find the album you want to add your photos to, press ‘Add Photos’ and they will be preserved for everyone’s enjoyment.

I have added a few over the years.