Great doco from 1969 — a world away now!

The Commonwealth Film Unit here in Oz has over the years made many documentaries, some awful, many really excellent, all of course propaganda either for home or overseas consumption, sometimes both. I have recently enjoyed a 1969 offering. available through the excellent National Sound and Film Archive.

The NFSA’s mission is to collect, preserve and share Australia’s vibrant and diverse audiovisual culture as embodied by our evolving collection – reflecting who we were, who we are, and who we want to be. 

Audiovisual technologies enable us to capture moments in time: moving image and sounds in their most vivid forms. At over 3 million items, the NFSA collection transforms these records into ‘living memories’ – the many facets of Australia’s peoples, cultures, ideas and beliefs, both over time and across the land.

The collection invites all Australians to connect, no matter their background and life experiences, and find common ground and a shared sense of community. All can access it to celebrate our cultures and learn from our history to build a better future. 

The particular item I saw is After Cook (1969):

Made by The Commonwealth Film Unit 1969. Directed by Donald Murray. Narrated by John Meillon. A survey of everyday life throughout Australia, emphasising the outdoor and rural element contrasted with modern, urban living and culture. A look at the Australian people, their character, attitudes and way of life. Every three years or so Film Australia made a general film on Australia. At its most basic the film would have a landscape sequence, then a farming sequence, then transport, then cities, then sport and night life. It would probably contain a mining explosion, a ballet class, Uluru (Ayers Rock) and kookaburras. After the first few films, the makers tried to find a new approach – to present its as a quiz show, or a computer report, or a film script conference. After Cook had as its working title ‘Fellow Countrymen’. Helped by the fact that it was made on 16mm with practicable synchronous sound, it is in its final version the warmest and one of the least predictable of all the general ‘Australia’ films.

Here are a few stills I captured:

A steelworker
Political demonstration in Sydney advocating — successfully — lowering the voting age from 21 to 18.
Shopping at Paddy’s Market, Sydney
Volunteer firefighters — bushfire in Sutherland Shire. Rather more sophisticated nowadays.
Family at a picnic playing cricket
CWA — Country Women’s Association — meeting
Country school-teacher
Ballet class

And so many more vignettes, so evocative for me — — some great footage of people going about their business in a very different Australia. This is the place I knew when in my first school appointment, Cronulla High, almost a lifetime away! In fact the Class of 1968, who have their own special private group on Facebook — I am a member! — are now like me septuagenarians! Can you believe it?

If you want to see it:

Let’s do the timewarp again: 2020, 2011, 1991!

Strap in! We’re spinning back!

I’ve been through Bogan Gate!

Posted on  by Neil

Over 50 years ago now! I posted about the experience in 2008.

I flew to Parkes and then caught the wheat train to Trundle via Bogan Gate. There was a passenger car on the back. It was a very slow train, taking almost all day to get to the end of the line. Just how slow you may see for yourself, though this one has no passenger car on the back…

…Blogger and broadcaster James O’Brien recently posted PARKES TO GRIFFITH.

Along the way we had also stopped at Condobolin (which I’ve blogged about separately) and the wonderfully named, “Bogan Gate” made famous a couple of years in this You-Tube video.

It is hilarious and informative! Scored 95,306 views since December 16, 2015. Mitchell Coombs was around 19 at that time. He has gone on to a career in media and is a powerful advocate for acceptance and diversity. I have selected just two of his many videos that have followed that Bogan Gate tour. I strongly recommend exploring on YouTube (or Facebook) for yourself….

2021: Particularly Facebook where he posts at least one story a day! I always watch them. And if you go to the original 2020 post there is more of his work.

It appears I took a rest from blogging on 14 October 2011.

Back again

Posted on  by Neil

Took a break from the internet for the past day and a half. Partly I was busy doing other things, partly I was reading. Reading went well, but there are future posts on that…

Meantime the same jerks are in the news. Who cares? Really!

Yes, back when Tony Abbott was actually (unfortunately) relevant. Before his attention-getting tour of Taiwan where he did a good version of this:

The day before I had posted:

Oh Lordie, Lordie! I am posting from Carbon Central NSW and the sky…

Posted on  by Neil

… is still there.

Indeed The Illawarra Mercury leads today with a far more exciting story.

ghost

The carbon tax did feature a few days back, as an incidental:

coal1
coal

Didn’t quite work out though. First, in 2014 Gujarat NRE changes name to Wollongong Coal. Then from 2019: Wollongong Coal Ltd v Gujarat NRE India Pty Ltd [2019] NSWCA 135.

Now the big leap back to preblogging days, indeed pre-Internet for me! Michael Xu and I were living in Redfern; it was our first year together. Enjoy — but you have to go to YouTube. It is worth it! “Ross Symonds presents a weekend edition of Seven Nightly News in 1991 from the Epping, Sydney television studios of ATN-7.”

Various lockdown hacks and escapes — 70 — October 3 2002

At that time I was “journalling” as I still called blogging on Diary-X. Sad what happened to Diary-X, and when it vanished entirely so did my blog. The bits preserved on the Internet Archive are few and far between. This one is still around because I copied it to a site I had on Angelfire, and that got captured by the Internet Archive. Here it is with some videos added.

3 October 2002: Vermont Street 1

At Vermont Street Monday to Friday at 5 pm without fail I would listen to the ABC Children’s Hour, a habit begun the previous year as my sister was a listener; she became an Argonaut and then so did I. I was Leda 37 (each member was allotted a “ship” and given a number), but I only ever won one Blue Certificate. Many quite prominent Australians have testified to how significant this rather odd radio program was in their lives.

Can I remember the Argonauts theme song? Let’s try:

Row, row, merry oarsmen row
That dangers lie ahead, we know, we know–
But bend with all your might
As we sail into the night
For wrongs we’re bound to right,
Jason cry–
“Adventurers,
Argonauts, row, row, row.”

Today is my brother’s birthday. Vermont Street saw many changes in his life, culminating in his marriage in 1955 (he was 19, she was 16), the last year we were there. 1953-1954 he had been in the Army, stationed at Holsworthy; it is worth recalling that the Korean War in which there were 1538 Australian casualties (including 281 killed) was still being fought up to July 1953. So by 1955 I was the only child left in our household. By the time he was 24 my brother had four children of his own. [I was wrong there I think, as that would make the 4th child born by 1959. It was actually three children at that stage. A fourth did arrive a few years later.]

My mother has written about the move to Vermont Street, what it meant, and the impact of the death of Jeanette, my sister, far more poignantly than I ever could. It was, as she said, the first home our family could call their own; Auburn Street had been rented, first by my grandfather Christison, and then by us. I had been born into a large extended family all under one roof–we were only there because of the War– though by 1949 that had come down to the nuclear family of Mum, Dad and three kids. Grandma and Grandpa Christison lived in Waratah Street which intersects with Vermont Street, so in the new house they were just around the corner. I spent almost as much time with them as I did at home, as Grandpa Christison was probably more a father to me than my father was; after all, I had known him longer! Also, he talked to me and answered all my questions–even about snails 😉

Very many days after school I would be at their place, and a regular event was to walk over the road, cut through the railway fence, and stand together by the pulsing and hissing C32 steam locomotive that at about 4.00 pm always sat on the goods line waiting for the all clear to proceed to Sydney with its train load of fresh Illawarra milk. Grandpa had befriended railway workers during his time in the country and loved to talk to the engine driver and fireman, who seemed to enjoy talking to him as well. I just loved steam engines, their smell, their heat, their sounds, their explicit power. I was fascinated too by their age: “Beyer Peacock England 1896” for example, on the side of some C32. Of course the magic moment was when the South Coast Daylight Express would come roaring down the line on its return journey to Sydney with its streamlined C38 and its beautiful Pullman carriages that I would dream of travelling in one day. Why, it would come rushing through at 60 or even 70 miles per hour! Wonderful.

3801 in full flight! See also Dennis Rittson’s Train Photos where you will find many more.

The goods trains had their excitement too, often double-headed up the hill from Jannali by a pair of deep-throated D-51s or, most exciting, one enormous D-57, or occasionally an oil-burning Baldwin (an American locomotive) or a huge Beyer-Garrett double-ended articulated loco. The latter were rare as their length and weight made them unsuitable for the Illawarra line as they tended to displace the rails on sharp bends!

A D57! Wonderful model train layout…

Now you didn’t know I knew so much about trains, did you? In those days I just loved them, and could tell even in the dead of night from my bedroom in Vermont Street just what class of engine was chuffing up the hill from Jannali, just by its sound.

My mother was less romantic about steam engines; she rather resented the black flecks of ash falling on her newly washed sheets!

The real things with sound…
The beautiful restored C38 — 2021

Various lockdown hacks and escapes — 69 — revisiting old haunts October 2011

The third and last from ten years back — a train trip to Sydney and Surry Hills, Oxford Street and old friends.

Train sequences — people watching to pass the time

PA160112
PA160113
PA160114
PA160102
PA160102a
PA160105
PA160108
PA160106
PA160107
PA160110

Crown Street Surry Hills:

PA160088a
PA160090
PA160093

On Oxford Street:

PA160096
Ray outside the Midnight Shift
PA160099
Sirdan and Ray, Midnight Shift

Various lockdown hacks and escapes — 68 — more photos from October 2011

10 October

PA080055
Mount Kembla from the house next-door to me.

12 October

PA120066
Sunrise from the Yum Yum Cafe, West Wollongong.

15 October

PA150078
From my window.

16 October

PA160120
Sunset — from my window.

25 October

PA240132
From my window.

30 October

PA300192
Sunrise from my balcony.

31 October

PA300200
Sunrise.

The next post will have highlights from the missing days, which include a trip to Sydney.