Seen in June 2009

Ten years ago! So mostly Surry Hills.

Surry Hills: the Kirk Gallery

0606 008

Central Station Chalmers Street — pre light rail!

1706 008

Elizabeth Street City:

1906 002

Surry Hills: Little India on Cleveland Street

0206 001

0206 004

My old haunt!

01apr 004

Advertisements

Morrison’s unfortunate choice

I shuddered:

The man responsible for community safety and multiculturalism in Scott Morrison’s new ministry has pledged to work closely with Islamic, Sudanese and other key communities but is making no apology for leading the charge against “African gangs” in his home city.

Liberal MP Jason Wood, a supporter of Peter Dutton in last year’s leadership coup, will now work underneath Mr Dutton in the Home Affairs portfolio as assistant minister for customs, community safety and multicultural affairs….

Not a good omen at all!

I have been beavering away over the years on this and previous blogs. Here is one set I am still very proud of and committed to:

Being Australian

In January 2011 I posted a series exploring this topic. Creating this page has also revealed I misnumbered the posts! Now corrected.

6

  1. Being Australian 1 — Waleed Aly on SBS last night

  2. Being Australian 2: the search for a lost utopia

  3. Being Australian 3: Richard Tognetti, Wollongong, multiculturalism

  4. Being Australian 4: joined the Diggers Club, mate!

And more. Do look!

M visits The Gong

Had a surprise phone call Sunday morning: M and a friend were driving down to Wollongong and wanted to lunch with me. We settled on City Diggers. Their Sunday menu was particularly good yesterday.

M (who had a serious accident on his bike a few months back) has healed well, though he is still off work.

P5040622

The view from Diggers looking north, five years ago, when they were still working on the new Mall in Crown Street.

Screenshot (264)

Intersection of Crown Street Mall and Church Street, looking south — 2018

Dead Central — and my convict ancestor

The State Library of NSW has an interesting exhibition now: “Dead Central, a new exhibition that opens on Saturday, pays tribute to the lives of those buried at the cemetery between its opening in 1820 and closure in 1867.” See also the exhibition site.

A vast cemetery once sprawled across the land bound by Sydney’s Elizabeth, Pitt and Devonshire streets — where Central Station now stands. The Devonshire Street cemetery opened in 1820, but the city’s major burial ground filled up quickly in the decades following, only to become overgrown and abandoned. In January 1901, when the state government announced its intention to clear the cemetery, well over 30,000 bodies were buried there.

It is most likely that Jacob Whitfield, my convict ancestor who arrived in Sydney in 1822, was buried there, though there is no record of this. Many of the records are lost.

Here is an image from the exhibition site:

c15551_0023_c

Last November I posted Hey you! That might be my great X3 grandfather!

Bizarre story from the Sydney Light Rail project a few days ago….

My great-great-great grandfather Jacob Whitfield was buried there. Or so we believe. See my series of family history posts, particularly on Jacob.

There is a Wiki Tree page on Jacob too. I first accessed it last Friday. An extract:

Death date and place unknown – Jacob is found still living in 1851 according to a news article. This would make him 92 years old !

Death and Burials : Friends Burial Ground – Old Devonshire Street Sandhills Cemetery, reference : “Burial Notes missing : Jacob Whitfield” no indication of his date of death or burial….

Friends Burial Ground – Old Devonshire Street Sandhills Cemetery, reference : “Burial Notes missing : Jacob Whitfield” no indication of his date of death or burial. Burials took place in the Friends Burial Ground from after 1851 ..

The Devonshire Street Cemetery (also known incorrectly as the Brickfield Cemetery or Sandhills Cemetery) was located between Eddy Avenue and Elizabeth Street, and between Chalmers and Devonshire Streets, at Brickfield Hill, in Sydney, Australia. It was consecrated in 1820.[1] The Jewish section was used from 1832.[2] By 1860, the cemetery was full, and it was closed in 1867….

That Wiki Tree page has lots of information congruent with the researches of Bob Starling and other family historians, and some that isn’t. Interesting. See also my Family stories 3 — About the Whitfields: from convict days which features quite a few contributions by those family historians…

60 years ago in Shellharbour

Back when I was 15/16 I attended the centenary of Shellharbour Public School. I was in the company of my parents, Jeff and Jean Whitfield, my grandfather Roy Christison and various Whitfield relatives in Shellharbour, such as Una Gerke. My grandfather was there as the oldest living headmaster of the school. Here are some images I posted last year:

post on Facebook’s Shellharbour History and Pictures has generated this wonderful war-time picture of my uncle Roy Christison Junior, my grandmother Ada Christison, and my grandfather Roy Christison Senior in Sydney. (Note the tram!)  Posted by my cousin Linda Christison.

Screenshot (169)a

In that same Facebook thread someone asked if anyone had seen a photo of Ada and Roy taken in the 1930s when Roy was headmaster of Shellharbour Public School. Well, I have: it is in my collection. That is the headmaster’s residence in Shellharbour.

royandada

So I looked over Trove and found three items. The last one should say Caringbah, not Callimbar! The middle one refers to my aunt Beth, Beth Heard in later life.

Screenshot (258)

Screenshot (259)

Screenshot (260)