Non sequiturs and The Tweet

I am a fan of Wiley Miller’s “Non Sequitur”: we get it in the Sydney Morning Herald.  Lately he’s been having fun with the “fake news”/”alternate facts” meme.

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A convincing take on where President Tweet’s head is at comes from Josephine Tovey this morning. It’s a bit of a worry.

There’s a new rule emerging for observers of American politics trying to understand a confusing new outburst or claim from President Donald Trump – go and check what’s happened on Fox News in the past 24 hours.

It was key to understanding his otherwise confounding comments about Sweden at a rally last weekend, when he told a fired-up crowd: “You look at what’s happening last night in Sweden. Sweden, who would believe this?”…

This was not a first. In fact, a huge number of Trump’s outbursts and falsehoods can be linked to something he saw on television or on one of his preferred websites….

It’s not only Fox that fires up the President. Several of his most egregious claims in recent months have come from or mirror those on America’s most prominent conspiracy website Infowars – which is perhaps best known for pushing the lie that the Sandy Hook school massacre was a hoax….

Meanwhile on Politico you find aggregated latest stories.  I guess Tweet would count them as “enemies of the people” when they run inconvenient stories like Trump’s disapproval rating keeps creeping up.

A majority of respondents said Trump is not honest (55 percent), doesn’t have good leadership skills (55 percent) or care about everyday Americans (53 percent), isn’t level-headed (63 percent), doesn’t share their values (60 percent) and is doing more to divide the country than unite it (58 percent). However, a majority also said they believe Trump is a strong (64 percent) and intelligent (58 percent) person.

“President Donald Trump’s popularity is sinking like a rock,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University poll. “He gets slammed on honesty, empathy, level-headedness and the ability to unite. And two of his strong points, leadership and intelligence, are sinking to new lows. This is a terrible survey one month in.”

But why should he worry? After all he won the most electoral college votes since Ronald Reagan, didn’t he? Not.

Mr Trump’s 2016 victory did not come close.

Former President Barack Obama won 332 votes in 2012 versus Mitt Romney’s 206 votes, a far higher number than Mr Trump’s 304 electoral college votes in 2016.

And Mr Obama won an even higher number – 365 – in 2008.

Bill Clinton gained 379 electoral college votes in 1996, and George H W Bush gathered an incredible 426 votes in 1988.

This amazing graphic shows quite clearly how the popular vote went — and confirms my belief in our Australian system of mandatory voting too! Bit hard to write these facts off as “fake news”, don’t you think?

imrs

Update

From the Toronto Star: The complete list of all 80 false things Donald Trump has said in his first 4 weeks as president.

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