Neil’s personal decades 17: 1895 – Whitfields again

Just thought I’d share some items about the branch of the family that went to Braidwood, even of this is not quite personal as I don’t know them, though my father in his youth did.

This is an amazing story: 1898

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Richard Leonard Whitfield (1870-1946), the son of Jacob 2, one of the brothers who went from Picton to Braidwood; Richard John Whitfield (1840-1929) and his son Richard John (1881-1979). See also Neil’s personal decades: 11 – 1875 – to Araluen and Braidwood, Stray stories of family and Australiana — 1 and Stray stories of family and Australiana — 2:

From William and Caroline’s 14 children the family spread from a start in Surry Hills to Picton and Braidwood and on to places such as Shellharbour, Wollongong, Coolah, Wellington, Gunnedah and heaven knows where! I am still not absolutely sure whether Picton or Braidwood came first*, or whether they were overlapping.  I did meet a number of the Picton Whitfields but have never been to Braidwood! I did however hear tales about Braidwood, and Araluen, and other places between the South Coast of NSW and Monaro.

I was interested to find this on the Millpond Farm site.

Australia’s Millpond Farm is located at Jembaicumbene, 10kms south of the New South Wales Southern Tablelands village of Braidwood. The property has a rich colonial history, and over the past two centuries has produced prize winning wheat, sheep & cattle. Gold was discovered at Jembaicumbene in 1851 and a variety of important historic gold mining sites and 19th century buildings survive  within our spectacular natural wetland in the middle Jembaicumbene valley.

Braidwood tray sulky by William Wentworth 1892

Description:

Dated 1892 Town Sulky by William Whitfield, Braidwood
$2,500        SOLD
My personal town sulky for the past three years, this was recovered from the original owner’s farm and restored by us three years ago. It is a beautifully balanced full size long tray sulky with dated axles, and has had new axle stubs and boxes, new Amish hickory wheels with iron tyres, new shafts, all new wood in Kauri pine, all original iron with reset springs, brass fittings and leather upholstery. Painted dark green with black, white and red fine lining, it is fitted with lamp irons, wingboards, stitched leather apron and boot. Very correct with every nut and bolt replaced using square nuts and all the right clips and straps. Stamped WW on many iron parts for William Whitfield, a Braidwood blacksmith shop operating 1860s to 1940s.

Seems a few in the family were highly skilled in trades such as this.

*Clearly Picton came first.

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